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Thursday, September 9, 2010

Tonight in Music: Rufus Wainwright, The Cave Singers, Big Freedia and More

Posted by Ethan Jayne on Thu, Sep 9, 2010 at 10:00 AM

TBA: RUFUS WAINWRIGHT, OREGON SYMPHONY

(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) See My, What a Busy Week!

KEXP SESSIONS: THE CAVE SINGERS, TED LEO AND THE PHARMACISTS, PHANTOGRAM, LAURA VEIRS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) See My, What a Busy Week!

MUSICFESTNW: MAJOR LAZER, BIG FREEDIA, DEELAY CEELAY, RUDE DUDES

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Read our article on Big Freedia.

The Thermals, Frank Turner, A.A. Bondy, Cold Cave and Baroness all after the jump!

For more of tonight's shows, check our complete live music listings.

MUSICFESTNW: THE THERMALS, TED LEO AND THE PHARMACISTS, PAST LIVES

(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Read our article on the Thermals.

MUSICFESTNW: JUSTIN TOWNES EARLE, FRANK TURNER, SALLIE FORD AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE, MBILLY

(Berbati's Pan, 10 SW 3rd) Think about everything you love about Billy Bragg (pop and politics, plus the occasional ode to the new brunette), minus everything you loathe (his self-righteousness and that "I look like Robert De Niro/I drive a Mitsubishi Zero" line from "Sexuality"), and you get Frank Turner. The (mostly) acoustic punk troubadour has a penchant for combining headlines and heartbreak into jittery anthems, while his lyricism brings to mind the motivational call-to-action of both Bragg and the saintly Joe Strummer. Turner is the real thing, a punk rock defibrillation that can jolt the life back into even the most calloused of listeners. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

MUSICFESTNW: A.A. BONDY, MARK OLSON, MIKE COYKENDALL, THE ALIALUJAH CHOIR, HENRY WAGON

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) With a pair of flawless solo albums, A.A. Bondy has moved far beyond his '90s alt-rock salad days as frontman for near-forgotten band Verbena. First came Bondy's American Hearts in 2007, an exquisite and assured record of folk ballads that hinted blackly at love and loss, with all the good parts of country mixed in for good measure. Then last year came When the Devil's Loose, a ramshackle and perhaps even better album, in which each song blares like a ragged anthem across an abandoned battlefield. Songs like "I Can See the Pines Are Dancing" and the gorgeous title track flicker like half-burned candles in the windows of Big Pink—further proof that Bondy has evolved into one of the finest singer/songwriters in America. NED LANNAMANN

MUSICFESTNW: COLD CAVE, REPORTER, DANGEROUS BOYS CLUB, ASSS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) If you'd asked me what you'd get when you combined former American Nightmare/Some Girls screamer Wesley Eisold with noise artist Prurient (Ian Dominick Fernow), my first guess would not have been insanely catchy and affecting darkwave synth pop. But that's exactly what the two and their crew (which formerly included Xiu Xiu's Caralee McElroy and currently features Mika Miko's Jennifer Clavin) do in Cold Cave. The band's 2009 debut, Love Comes Close, is a superb record of morose new wave, its apathetic drum-machine beats and simply effective synth hooks treated with only the slightest touch of noisy fuzz. Its title track is like what New Order might have sounded like if Ian Curtis had lived to lead them; others suggest what might have happened had Depeche Mode retained Vince Clarke's aptitude for earworms throughout their later gothic period. Cold Cave are further recommended by remixes from the likes of Optimo, Pantha Du Prince, and Arthur Baker. Damn! ERIC GRANDY

MUSICFESTNW: BARONESS, RED FANG, RABBITS, THE THORNES

(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) I don't care if you don't listen to metal. Have you heard the Blue Record by Baroness? Hol-eeee shee-yit. It's a monument of a record, a towering slab of riffage and powderkeg drums. It's heavy as fuck, and it's—saints be damned—really kind of beautiful in its own weird way. There are "Planet Caravan" moments of quietude, there's some insanely complicated prog-rock technical wizardry, and most importantly there's a gut-ton of heavy fucking metal. Of course, all the metal fans know this already—and know that Blue Record's predecessor, Red Album, is just as good—but the Savannah, Georgia, band has the kind of range, and a firm harness on more than just thunderous riffs, to appeal beyond the converted. The fact that Baroness aren't kings of the universe right now is baffling. Be prepared, because sooner or later, they will be. NL

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