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Friday, January 21, 2011

Tonight in Music: Jared Mees & the Grown Children, POH-Hop pt. 2, and much more

Posted by Colleen Smyth on Fri, Jan 21, 2011 at 3:33 PM


JARED MEES AND THE GROWN CHILDREN, AND AND AND, CHARTS

(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) No curfew. No work tomorrow. You gonna just stay home Friday night? Say goodbye to the workweek with boisterous pop tunes from two of Portland's best bands: Jared Mees and the Grown Children make effortlessly grin-along anthems, while And And And's explosive live sets showcase their ingenious, damaged folk rock. Yes, you are allowed to drink. NED LANNAMANN


POH-HOP: FREEWAY, JAKE ONE, TANYA MORGAN, ILLMACULATE, ONRY OZZBORN, & MORE

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Read our article on Freeway and Jake One.


THE HANDSOME FAMILY, SEAN ROWE

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on the Handsome Family.


ATLANTIC/PACIFIC, HARLOWE AND THE GREAT NORTH WOODS

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) Read our article onAtlantic/Pacific.


GLASS CANDY, CHROMATICS, DESIRE, RUDE DUDES

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Fact: Attendees at a Glass Candy/Chromatics show are on average 30 percent more attractive than at any other show. But don't blame the glittery, joined-at-Johnny-Jewel's-hip bands for being beautiful—they work hard, too. Both are fronted by magnetic females: Glass Candy's Ida No commands the stage with ferocity, ripping her own stockings and dripping sweat to make sure not a single person leaves their Italo-disco universe feeling robbed. And while Chromatics' Ruth Radelet is a doll-like and chilly presence onstage as she runs through their eerie, slow-jam set, rest assured that when the balloons come down at a Glass Candy/Chromatics affair, everyone is invited. MARJORIE SKINNER



METAL SHAKESPEARE COMPANY, BADLANDS, WIZARD RIFLE

(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) All things must come to an end, as is the case with the Metal Shakespeare Company, Portland's finest—and only—metal act that pays tribute to the majestic prose of the Bard of Avon. The witty fools of MSC split time between dingy metal shows and classing it up at Shakespeare festivals all over the map, all the while donning tights as restrictive as sausage casings, leaving little to the imagination. Proving that Old English truly does belong in heavy metal, and not just as a typeface, the Metal Shakespeare Company will be missed. Don't skip your final chance to say goodbye—or, God be with ye—to the band.
EZRA ACE CARAEFF



ELIZABETH COOK, TIM CARROLL

(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) In the vast traditionalist swamp of good old-fashioned country music, Elizabeth Cook never stops distinguishing herself. Her 2007 LP Balls earned its title with the hit "Sometimes It Takes Balls to Be a Woman" and a gorgeous cover of the Velvet Underground's "Sunday Morning," and Cook's 2010 LP Welder leaves Balls in the dust. The music of Welder runs the gamut, from the twangy stomp of "El Camino" to the stripped-down acoustics of "Follow You Like Smoke" and beyond, but the lyrics are of a piece—simply witty, deeply telling, packed with the kind of pristine details that make you think songwriters should be eligible for Pulitzers. And, oh yeah: Five days a week she hosts "Elizabeth Cook's Apron Strings," a Sirius XM radio show featuring four hours of music, recipes, and household cleaning tips. As part of her McMenamins Great Northwest Music Tour, Cook plays Edgefield's Blackberry Hall tonight and the Kennedy School gym on Thursday, January 27.
DAVID SCHMADER



COPY, HEAD LIKE A KITE, TAPE DECK MOUNTAIN

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Tape Deck Mountain resides somewhere between the lush, utopian garden and the shambolic dystopian wasteland of your imagination. Actually, this duo hails from San Diego, and, no, I don't have the slightest idea what their name means. I do know that these chaps like to make a racket, albeit a gentler racket that lies just beneath a layer of shoegaze haze. Vocals are secondary, showing up sporadically through distorted lenses. Fortunately, Tape Deck Mountain knows about dynamics. Instead of being intent on lulling you to sleep, they sneak in a wall of guitar noise just as your eyelids start to grow heavy. And as you'll hear on the band's latest Secret Serf EP, they can also work in a hook or two. Tape Deck Mountain might just be the band of your dreams, and your nightmares as well. MARK LORE

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