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Thursday, March 10, 2011

Tonight in Music: Morning Teleportation, Drive-By Truckers, Guidance Counselor, and more

Posted by Colleen Smyth on Thu, Mar 10, 2011 at 3:13 PM


MORNING TELEPORTATION, YOURS, THE PINK SNOWFLAKES

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Morning Teleportation.


DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS, HEARTLESS BASTARDS

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell; also, Drive-By Truckers perform an in-store at 4 pm at Music Millennium, 3158 E Burnside) Read our article Drive By Truckers.


SNACK ATTACK 2011: GUIDANCE COUNSELOR, FORBIDDEN FRIENDS, UNKLE FUNKLE, DJ SNAKKS

(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Stuff your earholes with fine local music and cram your mouthhole with delicious treats at Holocene's Snack Attack 2011. There will be cooking demonstrations, baked goods for the noshing, plus live sets from Forbidden Friends, Guidance Counselor, and plenty more. No dancing until you've cleaned your plate. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


LIZ HARRIS, THE TENSES, JONNYX AND THE GROADIES, WHY I MUST BE CAREFUL, GHOST TO FALCO

(The Artistery, 4315 SE Division) The end is approaching swiftly for the Artistery, but there's still time to pay another visit to the sweltering basement—not to mention the solid, well-priced used vinyl store that's housed in the all-ages venue's ground floor. Tonight sees a wide-ranging bill of local experimental music-makers, from the pulverizing grindcore of JonnyX and the Groadies to the avanter-than-avant free jazz of Why I Must Be Careful. There's also the deconstructionist noise-folk of Ghost to Falco, which sometimes transmogrifies into stoner-stomp rock, and the ominously serene abstract hymns of Liz Harris, who usually performs as Grouper and has two new albums on the horizon. Among the many, many wonderful things the Artistery has done for the local music community—serving as a haven for all-ages shows not the least among them—is their fearless support of the city's experimental music scene. Tonight's a chance to celebrate the different, disparate fringes in one fell swoop. NED LANNAMANN


PUDDLETOWN SCHOOL BENEFIT: JAMES MERCER

(Bagdad Theater, 3702 SE Hawthorne) Those hoping for a pint of Hammerhead and a screening of Machete will be disappointed to see James Mercer onstage tonight (he is many things, but Danny Trejo is not one of them). Yet supporters of local education and fans of the Shins/Broken Bells frontman will be downright delighted by this rare solo performance from Mercer. His performance will raise funds for the Puddletown School, a cozy Montessori preschool and kindergarten located in Southeast Portland. If you didn't get your tickets, y ou'll probably end up watching a movie anyway, since this show is very sold out.
EAC

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.


THE SPITTIN' COBRAS, LOST CITY, DECORO, LUKE VALLEY

(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) Sixty-five-year-old Lemmy Kilmister still does speed and drinks a fifth of Jack a day. Why cut these habits out when they are still responsible for some of the most high-octane metal to ever roll in on two wheels named Harley? We doubt the Spittin' Cobras' intake is anywhere near that excessive, but their fire-under-your-ass punk metal seems intravenously connected to the forefathers of this ilk. While frontman Alx Karchevsky can at times echo Bon Scott (with the Cobras riffin' off the rails like Angus Young), the Seattle-based four-piece seems to live life like it's their last day on Earth, riding high on whiskey and adrenaline from their horns-up bro-down. TRAVIS RITTER


KAKI KING, WASHINGTON

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) We used to make fun of the guy who played the Ovation guitar. You know, the Ovation: the pear-shaped, plastic-backed acoustic guitar that eschews a large, centered soundhole in favor of a bunch of little flowery ones up in the corner. The guitar was designed out of synthetic polymers rather than natural wood in order to minimize onstage feedback, but it did so at the cost of sounding like a snapped rubber band. The Ovation was the acoustic equivalent of the Steinberger electric guitar: If a guy played one, you wouldn't let him in your band. I've since discovered the benefits of the Ovation: notably, a cleaner, more precise sound that doesn't work so well with the standard acoustic folky strum, but works splendidly with the complex, mathy progressions of Kaki King. Her finger-tapping style has earned her the occasional plaudit as the best female shredder around (fully reserve your judgment until you see Marnie Stern play on Wednesday, March 16), and if her technical ability still slightly overshadows her songwriting chops, it's no less awe inspiring in the live setting. NL


SIMIAN MOBILE DISCO, THE JUAN MACLEAN, BLONDES, EVAN ALEXANDER

(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) English twosome Simian Mobile Disco makes "hands (and feet) in the air" dance music via mostly analog technology. Their club bangers have a rougher, rawer edge than most of their peers'. Check "Tits and Acid" (without which life would be unbearable) for ample proof. Simian Mobile Disco are touring behind Delicacies, a bold experimental-techno diversion. And don't sleep on the Juan MacLean; besides being one of DFA's key artists, he's an epicurean house and disco DJ. DAVE SEGAL


HUGH CORNWELL, LSD&D

(East End, 203 SE Grand) While the Stranglers still make the rounds, it's just not the same without original frontman Hugh Cornwell behind the mic—much like the soulless, and Paul Weller-less, From the Jam. Stranglers-free for over two decades now, Cornwell is a respected solo artist these days, currently touring on his recent Hooverdam recording alongside a backing band, including James White and the Blacks' bassist Steve Fishman, and Blondie's Clem Burke behind the kit. Cornwell will give you twice the bang for your buck tonight, performing a set of solo material and then playing the Stranglers' must-own debut album Rattus Norvegicus in its entirety. Lucky you. EAC

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.

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