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Friday, March 18, 2011

Tonight in Music: Purple & Green at Supernature, Warpaint, Great Wilderness, and more

Posted by Colleen Smyth on Fri, Mar 18, 2011 at 3:26 PM


SUPERNATURE: ANCIENT HEAT, PURPLE AND GREEN, STARLIGHT & MAGIC, DJ E*ROCK, DJ COPY, DJ BJ

(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Read our article on Purple & Green.


WARPAINT, PVT, FAMILY BAND

(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The artful, baleful music of Warpaint is persistently enveloping, drawing over your ears a thick, heavy curtain of post-punk, art-folk, ambient-rave-prog-rock, and other previously nonexistent genres. The all-female LA quartet's debut album The Fool never reveals its entrancing mysteries, despite countless compulsive re-listens. NED LANNAMANN


After dropping the vowels from their original name, Pivot, the Sydney-based, Warp-signed PVT released Church with No Magic, the follow-up to 2008's O Soundtrack My Heart. But where they left the vowels, they found a voice. The synthy, mostly instrumental post-rock/prog pollination of O Soundtrack My Heart has made way for experimental vocal treatments, brighter tones, and ricocheting beats that bounce off the walls of Church with No Magic. The Aussie trio isn't minimal or restrained by any regard, and they fill all available gaps with a busy, multi-tracked assault of synthesized elements that constantly bombard the listener at that point where darkness meets daylight. And you'll be wide awake to experience it. TRAVIS RITTER

greatwilderness.jpg

LISTEN:

Great Wilderness - "Intimation"

GREAT WILDERNESS, COME GATHER ROUND US, HARLOWE AND THE GREAT NORTH WOODS

(The Woods, 6637 SE Milwaukie) Prepare to be smitten. Relative newcomers Great Wilderness are releasing their Rest EP this evening, and it's as strong a debut recording as you are likely to hear for quite some time. Produced by Victor Paul Nash (Point Juncture, WA), the six-song recording is compiled of texturally flawless folk songs anchored by the feathery soft vocals of singers Jamie McMullen and Emily Wilder. The confessionary "Helium" centers around the creeping violin of Laura Kucera, yet is neatly hemmed in by the song's doomed chorus ("fire eats away my heart, fire eats away my mind") and gradual descent into silence. Much like the opening notes of our introduction to Laura Gibson on 2006's If You Come to Greet Me, there is an instant comfort and ease to Rest, a natural beginning of what is likely to be a long, fruitful relationship between both artist and fan. Lucky us. EZRA ACE CARAEFF

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.


THE VOLT PER OCTAVES, BERNIE WORRELL, HURTBIRD

(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Make some room for Dr. Woo—that's Bernie Worrell to you, the legendary funk keyboardist who was a member of Parliament/Funkadelic during their historic '70s run and also contributed to classic Talking Heads records in the '80s. You've heard Worrell's synths, and you've heard the countless imitators who have come since. Worrell sits in tonight with Volt Per Octaves, made up of husband-and-wife duo Nick and Anna Montoya, plus their daughter Eva. The Montoya family employs Moog synthesizers to make a wobbly, retro-futuristic sound, the Moog (rhymes with "rogue," don't let your music-snob friends hear you saying otherwise) being one of the first widely produced analog synths. Initially a hugely cumbersome device, the Moog was brought to the masses by Wendy Carlos' 1968 Switched-On Bach album, and was refined and streamlined (and reduced to a much more manageable size) in the later Moog Modular and Minimoog models. On their own, the Volt Per Octaves often make a spacey, languid sound, but rest assured that with Worrell sitting in, those bubble-squeaky synths will be utilized for some very warped funk. NL


THE MOTHER HIPS, THE PARSON RED HEADS

(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) If ever a musical group is named the patron saints of College Bands Who Stood the Test of Time, the Mother Hips should be top nominees. Formed in the early '90s as undergrads at Chico State, they lived the dream of being signed by Rick Rubin to American Records—of Johnny Cash fame—while still in school. Although that didn't last, the band has steadily churned out records of hazy, psych-tinged California pop in the two decades since. In the absence of any widespread fame or fortune, the Hips have garnered legions of devoted fans only slightly calmer and less far-out than those of Phish. And despite hiatuses and member shake-ups, an incarnation of the original group continues to play and release new material, most recently, 2009's perfectly pleasant Pacific Dust. MARANDA BISH

A complete listing of this week's shows can be viewed here.

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