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Friday, May 27, 2011

Tonight in Music: Supernature, Animal Farm, Aloe Blacc and More!

Posted by Arian Jalali on Fri, May 27, 2011 at 2:26 PM


SUPERNATURE: E*ROCK, STRATEGY, DJ COPY, DJ ZAC ENO
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Artist, DJ, music videographer, and runner of the Audio Dregs label—I guess it's understandable that E*Rock may have been too busy to release a new record of his own as of late. That changes at tonight's installment of Supernature, where he'll release the long-awaited The Clock and the Mountain. Expect to dance and trip the eff out. MARJORIE SKINNER


ANIMAL FARM, PHILLY'S PHUNKESTRA, AL 1, KP, COOL NUTZ
(Mt. Tabor Theater, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Read our article on Animal Farm.


ALOE BLACC
(Dante's, 1 SW 3rd) Simply put, Aloe Blacc's Good Things is a damn near perfect album. Last year's breakthrough recording for the soulful Cali crooner—who is also an integral part of the afternoon sangria-and-sunshine party the Do-Over—topped many a critic's year-end list, and established lead single "I Need a Dollar" as the omnipresent anthem for the hand-to-mouth underclass. In fact, the entirety of Good Things resonates like a re-imagined What's Going On?, delicately capturing the worrisome reality of youth in modern-day America. Along with Raphael Saadiq, Blacc is at the forefront of the modern soul renaissance, and his unrestricted, medley-heavy live sets only seem to confirm this. Missing this show would be an outright crime. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


COTTON JONES, THE PARSON RED HEADS, SCRIMSHANDER
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) This little newspaper has yet to rappel down from its Cotton Jones reverie. The husband/wife duo of Michael Nau and Whitney McGraw wowed us at last year's Pickathon with an honest performance under the momentary Oregon sun, and their records—most recently, the reverberating late afternoons of full-length Tall Hours in the Glowstream, and a joyful gospel blip of the EP Sit Beside Your Vegetables—have remained as constant in our ears as their shows in our music listings. And what once began as a re-imagining of Nau and McGraw's nationally heralded act Page France, Cotton Jones is gaining more momentum and attention based on its own merits—this show at the Doug Fir is their first headlining gig in Portland, with a trip to play Sasquatch! in the Gorge shortly thereafter, and all of it is extremely well deserved. If you haven't yet had the pleasure of seeing this fantastic band live, tonight is your chance—don't miss it. RAQUEL NASSER


YEASAYER, SMITH WESTERNS, HUSH HUSH
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) The Hype Machine declared New York art-rockers Yeasayer the most blogged about band in 2010, which in this digital age perhaps seems like a greater accolade than actually selling the most records. But this seems surprising: Were more people really talking about Yeasayer on the internet last year than any other band? After a striking debut with 2007's All Hour Cymbals, the group released a mostly unpleasant-sounding follow-up with Odd Blood in February of 2010. That record had high expectations and a strong lead single in the form of "Ambling Alp," but then turned out to be a day-glo mush of headachy digital sounds, occasionally gelling into appealing retro-'80s pop alchemy, as on "O.N.E." and "Madder Red." This is Yeasayer's final push before retreating into the studio for album number three, and it's likely they'll preview some new songs; whether the third album will be as good as the first is anyone's guess. At the very least, the band has proven that they're worth talking about. NED LANNAMANN


FLOATER, THE DAYS THE NIGHTS
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Radical Sabbatical, the 2009 release from local rockers the Days the Nights, was a welcome surprise of complex, hook-heavy anthems aimed squarely at listeners who appreciate the fine art of riffage, plus those who recognize the underappreciated influence of Ken Andrews. The band returns with a seven-song EP, Neon Lion, which continues this trend and helps fill the woefully depleted genre of listenable heavy rock. Good luck dislodging the hook from "America's Religion" from your brain—it's a must-hear hit song that KUFO should put in heavy rotation. That is, if KUFO ever played local music during decent hours and, well, still existed. EAC

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