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Friday, July 22, 2011

Tonight in Music: PDX POP NOW!, Katy Perry, TV on the Radio and more!

Posted by Arian Jalali on Fri, Jul 22, 2011 at 2:39 PM


PDX POP NOW!: AND AND AND, THE CHICHARONES, GOLDEN RETRIEVER, THE MINDERS, LOVERS, RESERVATIONS, WEINLAND & MORE
(Refuge, 116 SE Yamhill) The eighth incarnation of PDX Pop Now! turns up at a brand-new location. It's still in the Southeast industrial neighborhood, and it's still all local, all ages, and all FREE, so don't miss Portland's best summertime party with 44 rad local bands. SUZETTE SMITH Also see our article on PDX Pop Now!.


KATY PERRY, ROBYN, RYE RYE, DJ SKEET SKEET
(Rose Garden, 1 Center Court) Tonight's fun-tastic concert requires a "two-brain" approach: Use Brain #1 (smart brain) to enjoy the intelligent soulful pop of the wildly underrated Robyn, and use Brain #2 (dumb brain) to enjoy the hilariously simplistic but undeniably hooky songs of professional fun gal Katy Perry. WM. STEVEN HUMPHREY—NOTE: Robyn has canceled!


TV ON THE RADIO, MENOMENA
(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey, Troutdale) The triumph of TV on the Radio's fourth album, Nine Types of Light—continuing a winning streak that also includes portions of their OK Calculator CD-R and the 2003 EP Young Liars—was overshadowed by the untimely death of bassist Gerard Smith little more than a week after the record's release. With a bit more space between that tragic event and now, Nine Types of Light holds up as yet another thought-provoking collection of the stylistically wide-ranging art pop that the virtually peerless band has come to be known for. If songs like "Keep Your Heart" are simplistically sentimental, other tracks like the gospel-disco of "Second Song," the aggressive autobahn-funk of "Repetition," and the gracious, slow-moving "Killer Crane" show that TV on the Radio is still making some of the most exceptional brain candy there is to be had. NED LANNAMANN


PINK MOUNTAINTOPS, 1776
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Pink Mountaintops could have stopped at "Tourist in Your Town." The song, buried at the end of their 2004 self-titled debut, is pure perfection: a jangly and simplistic rock number that feels like it was unearthed from that mysterious Velvet Underground yard-sale acetate from a few years back. It is, simply put, one of my most favorite songs ever. While it's commonplace to consider Pink Mountaintops as the side project to the more popular Black Mountain—a band as essential to stonerdom as an eighth of weed and a vaporizer—I feel it's the other way around. Frontman Stephen McBean is at his best when he twists his lazy vocal drawl around hazy pop songs, sounding like the a long lost Reid brother. Pink Mountaintops' latest, Outside Love, came out a couple years back, so keep your fingers crossed that McBean wins us over with some new material tonight. EZRA ACE CARAEFF


DANAVA, FEDERATION X, LEADERS, GAYTHEIST
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Federation X has become like Halley's Comet. With a bit of luck and timing you might just catch a glimpse. And if you do, consider yourself blessed. But Federation X isn't some far-off twinkle through a telescope—it's the hell-shaking thud of a fiery asteroid slamming into earth. A working band through the late '90s and mid-'00s, Federation X have since dropped off the map almost entirely. The trio's last record came out in 2005 and in the last few years they've played only a handful of dates, often few and far between. It's a damn shame. Federation X is a stunning hybrid. Too ADD to be stoner rock and too melodic to be metal, the trio shreds sweaty, hooked headbangers, and like Nirvana, they once employed Steve Albini as an engineer. Come to think of it, mix Albini's Shellac with some Nirvana and you'd damn near get Fed X. ANDREW R TONRY


JEREMY MESSERSMITH, THE LUMINEERS, NICKI BLUHM
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) At the risk of complete emasculation, I must first say this: The music of Jeremy Messersmith evokes images of kittens—lots of them, but not so many that there appears to be a rogue kitty invasion—nuzzling a small child eating an ice cream cone. There is some utterly endearing quality that exists in the tonality of Messersmith's voice—a soaring ethereality à la Brian Wilson, though delightfully subdued and devoid of any detectable tumult. Not to mention his unwavering ability to craft saccharine pop songs about life, death, and the Death Star (as heard on "Tatooine," the transient love song named for the home of the Skywalkers), all of which have gained him much acclaim in his home city of Minneapolis and enabled him to jump on hotel beds around the country (as seen in the video for swinging "Lazy Bones," off 2010's The Reluctant Graveyard). If you feel your week is lacking in the "Fucking Adorable" column, head straight to this show for satiation. RAQUEL NASSER

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