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Monday, February 6, 2012

Tonight in Music: Perfect Pickle, Still Caves, Twin Sister

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Mon, Feb 6, 2012 at 11:39 AM


PERFECT PICKLE: DJ ANJALI AND THE INCREDIBLE KID, CÉCILIA UND DIE SAUERKRAUTS, DENVER, PETE KREBS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) In its second year running, the Dill Pickle Club's Perfect Pickle combines more than a few of your favorite things: a pickle tasting/competition featuring submissions from the likes of Biwa and Olympic Provisions, among others, live music from bands like Denver, celeb judges like Dave "Killer Bread" Dahl, and more! MARJORIE SKINNER


STILL CAVES, ZODIAC DEATH VALLEY, BATH PARTY
(Ella Street Social Club, 714 SW 20th Pl) Still Caves' sound is defined by memorable melodies that shine through walls of reverb-drenched vocals and fuzzed-out guitars. The almost inaudible vocals are tastefully pulled back in the mix to add to the ethereal psychedelic effect of the band's music. Driving drums and bass lay out the perfect backdrop for the wall of sound that they provide in their live shows and recordings. Still Caves are a definite up-and-coming band to keep an eye on for all fans of experimental garage rock and psych-pop. ARIAN JALALI


TWIN SISTER, AVA LUNA, PURE BATHING CULTURE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Whether you happen to be reclining in a lounge chair with a white wine spritzer or swaggering across a dance floor in your best spandex, Twin Sister have you covered. It's surprising that this chilled-out quintet is from Long Island, sounding as it does like British dream popsters who secretly yearn for disco. On last year's In Heaven, their one and only LP, the vibe centers on layers of shimmery guitars overlaying laidback drums, both real and synth. But the key here is vocalist Andrea Estella, who couldn't sound less like a Long Islander. In general, she heroically avoids the temptation to ape the aching fragility of trip-hop chanteuses like Beth Gibbons, which would be a natural fit for Twin Sister's music. Instead, she consistently delivers vocal confidence, even when singing about the vulnerability of twentysomethings making their way in the world. REBECCA WILSON

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