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Friday, March 9, 2012

Tonight in Music: The Alialujah Choir, Milk Music, New Multitudes & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Mar 9, 2012 at 1:11 PM


THE ALIALUJAH CHOIR, RYAN SOLLEE, CARLOS FORSTER, SHELLEY SHORT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on the Alialujah Choir.


GRAVE BABIES, LIGHTHOUSE, MILK MUSIC, CHROME WINGS
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Pretty cool that Olympia-based Milk Music don't give a shit about signing to a label, or maintaining even the slightest presence on the internet, yet they're still one of the most buzzed-about bands in the Pacific Northwest right now. When you see the four-piece live, you'll understand why: Milk Music are one of the most motivated and authentic bands around, looking shockingly like, um, a real band. And it's all for the love of music. Steeped in punk lore and alternative traditions of the Northwest, Milk Music are doing things the way bands used to 20 years ago, unspoiled by the digital hype machine. Seriously, these guys legitimately sound like they could have come out of Seattle in the late '80s, like an SST compilation circa the slack-about glory days of alt-progenitors Dinosaur Jr. and HÜsker DÜ. CHRIS CANTINO


NEW MULTITUDES, SARAH JAFFE
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) Woody Guthrie wrote far more songs than he recorded, and in many cases he didn't write the music down. When he died in 1967, he left behind scads of lyrics; Billy Bragg and Wilco famously teamed up to record some for the two Mermaid Avenue albums. Now four more songwriters have done the same thing, tackling a batch of unearthed Guthrie lyrics that largely date from his time in Los Angeles. The resultant New Multitudes album is, as to be expected, a grimly reverential but rewarding collection, highlighted by contributions from Centro-matic's Will Johnson—one of the most vital American songwriters currently functioning—and Son Volt's Jay Farrar. Elsewhere, My Morning Jacket's Yim Yames (who still insists on being called Yim Yames for some reason) offers airy, meandering gibberish that reminds me of that godawful "What's Become of the Baby" song from the Dead's Aoxomoxoa. And Anders Parker, from some band you've never heard of, is the guy whose voice you don't recognize. Get there early for opener Sarah Jaffe, who's fantastic. NED LANNAMANN


JUNO WHAT?!
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) If you're looking to get down to some sweet, sweet vocoder action, Denver's Juno What?! have the prescription for what ails ya. Brandishing irresistibly danceable '80s-style funk beats, the Denver outfit will have you doing the robot all night long. NED LANNAMANN


ANDREW JACKSON JIHAD, LAURA STEVENSON AND THE CANS, ROAR,
KIND OF LIKE SPITTING

(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Listening to Andrew Jackson Jihad's latest LP, Knife Man, in solitude is dissatisfying. It isn't because their material is vapid—as a matter of fact, this is some of the sharpest, prettiest, most provocative folk-punk around—but because these are songs that downright require sweaty, tempestuous, top-of-the-lungs sing-alongs in order to reach their full potential. The songs on Knife Man are uncomfortably misanthropic and heartbroken (not to mention heartbreaking) and at moments sound like the work of a sugar-high Randy Newman; the fact that their song "Darling, I Love You" stirred up the same sort of controversy "Short People" did 35 years ago is testament to the comparison, and reveals that, by and large, people still misinterpret satire. Also on the bill is the long-awaited return of Ben Barnett's Kind of Like Spitting; the new incarnation includes two of Barnett's former students from the School of Rock. MORGAN TROPER


COCK BLOCK: CAMEA, DJ CLAIRITY,
MISS VIXEN

(Groove Suite, 440 NW Glisan) Originally from Seattle, Camea became interested in the sounds of minimal techno just as the scene was emerging internationally. She moved to New York in the early '00s and started up the now-thriving Clink Recordings with like-minded producers Tim Xavier, Ambivalent, and Tony Rohr. Clink served as an important outpost of a particular brand of minimal techno that was otherwise largely based out of Europe at the time. Now a Berlin transplant and operating at the very top of her game, Camea's swinging back through the Pacific Northwest to boost up a couple of local dance parties with the patented Clink sound. Years of producing music and performing live around the world have shaped her music into something original—a perfect combination of minimal and heavy, with just enough funk and playfulness to keep a dance floor engaged for the long haul. AVA HEGEDUS

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