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Saturday, March 24, 2012

Tonight in Music: The Malt Ball, Plants and Animals, Paradise & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, Mar 24, 2012 at 11:30 AM

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THE MALT BALL
(Bossanova Ballroom, 722 E Burnside)

MALT BALLS—Look how smart we are: We combined a huge gathering of local breweries (17 of 'em) sampling out their sudsy goodness with a full day of kickass bands (12 of 'em), including sets from Denver, Lord Dying, Weinland, and the Builders and the Butchers. Come for the beer and stay for the music, or vice versa, but come. Stay. Good dog. MARJORIE SKINNER Also read our feature story on the Malt Ball.


PLANTS AND ANIMALS, LITTLE SCREAM, HOSANNAS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Plants and Animals.


PARADISE, 1939 ENSEMBLE, DJ MERCEDEZ
(Langano Lounge, 1435 SE Hawthorne) Diary of an Old Soul, the debut from Portland band Paradise, is a jackbooted, blue-jeaned rock 'n' roll record, with plenty of distorted organ and crunchy guitar. Their debut video is a straight-up homage to the Small Faces, and they've got a bit of ? and the Mysterians in their jumpy, nervy garage. Diary of an Old Soul is a very good debut indeed, and it sees a release on 12-inch vinyl tonight at what should be a very mod kind of party—be prepared to shake it Shindig-style. NED LANNAMANN


YPPAH, ANOMIE BELLE, CARS AND TRAINS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Yppah (AKA Long Beach-based multi-instrumentalist/producer Joe Corrales Jr.) is one of those rare Americans who record for England's venerable Ninja Tune label. On his new full-length, Eighty One, he constructs moving, electro-organic instrumentals not too different from those of celebrated veteran Ninja Tune acts like Cinematic Orchestra and Bonobo. Yppah creates the illusion of leading a full band (perhaps one produced by orchestral-funk genius David Axelrod and enamored of shoegaze rock), but Eighty One consists only of his handiwork, along with exquisite parts on four tracks by classically trained Seattle violinist/vocalist Anomie Belle. Should be a grand(iose) night. DAVE SEGAL


SHROUDED STRANGERS, SAD HORSE, KARL AND THE JERKS
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) Portland ramshackle rock weirdos Karl and the Jerks are a motley crew, featuring members of the Bugs, Evolutionary Jass Band, and New Bad Things. The six-piece plays rock and roll that's straightforward and off-balance at the same time—there's enough guitar fuzz and sax skronk here to stick to the walls of a dimly lit basement, or a sock hop in Hades. Rolling through town for the bill are Virginia's Shrouded Strangers, another pieced-together group of misfits known for lengthy stabs at the Velvet Underground and Sonic Youth in addition to their own otherworldly tunes. Watch as these space cadets bring the Messier 83 galaxy to the Kenton Club. MARK LORE


ROBERT GLASPER EXPERIMENT, SOULMATES
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Jazz pianist Robert Glasper's musical genius resolves jazz, hiphop, and neo-soul into one smooth and limpid stream of sound. If you are not familiar with his work—and you probably are but do not know it (he has worked with Common, J Dilla, Erykah Badu, and Jay-Z)—a great place to start is his version of Sade's "Cherish the Day." Who knew you could squeeze even more beauty out of that already very beautiful tune? Robert Glasper makes music for a black race that has been to space and back. CHARLES MUDEDE


LUCERO, THE DROWNING MEN
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Breaking news: Lucero's new album, Women & Work, features Southern barroom rock songs about women, ghosts, and drinking. There's slide guitar, there are horns. There's a high-energy love song about a woman with a kiss like lightning and a weepy, self-deprecating tune about the one who got away. Hunky singer Ben Nichols says the words "baby," "darlin'," "honey," and "drink" over and over again. Women & Work is everything that every Lucero record has been before. But goddamn if I don't fall for it each time. Sure, the Memphis band keeps writing the same few songs repeatedly, but what's the crime in that when they do it so well? MEGAN SELING

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