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Sunday, June 17, 2012

Tonight in Music: John Fogerty, Jail Weddings and Low Times

Posted by Lex Chase on Sun, Jun 17, 2012 at 11:58 AM


(Edgefield, 2126 SW Halsey) Look, I don't care if you think you're sick to death of evergreens like "Bad Moon Rising" and "Fortunate Son." Nor do I care that John Fogerty looks like an old lesbian now. The man is simply one of the finest American songwriters to ever grace this earth—I'm talking Stephen Foster, George Gershwin, Woody Guthrie level. If you don't believe me, take yet another listen to Chronicle, that flawless, 20-track summation of Creedence Clearwater Revival's stunningly short career (four years!), and simply the greatest "greatest hits" disc ever pressed to metal, or plastic, whatever the fuck CDs are made out of. (If your local doesn't have Chronicle in the juke, raise a fuss.) Just ask the Dude: Creedence is where it's at. John Fogerty's performing tonight, and all of Oregon should be excited. After all, this is the man responsible for not one, but two of the best songs about rain ever written. NED LANNAMANN


(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) Jail Weddings are a beautiful train wreck: a traveling rock 'n' roll carnival from Los Angeles with a dangerously romantic shot of soul. At the Jail Weddings shows I've attended, people tend to drink heavily, dance recklessly, and make out (sometimes with strangers). The band has around a dozen members, though the numbers fluctuate, and lots of instruments: horns, guitars, and killingly gorgeous lady backup singers. Singer, bandleader, and trickster-in-chief Gabriel Hart says he chose his bandmates for their personalities as much as for their artistry. Jail Weddings have plenty of both. Maybe too much for their own good: One of their iconic early songs, a soulful ballad that's part Buddy Holly and part Stax Records, is titled "I Am Fucking Crazy." That's not hyperbole. BRENDAN KILEY


(East End, 203 SE Grand) Low Times write compact, slightly sinister garage-rock songs that sneakily insinuate themselves into your bloodstream. Their music has a ramschackle urgency and coiled thrust that will probably translate into even more exciting sounds in East End's subterranean space. Fans of the Intelligence, Ty Segall, and Night Beats should become enamored of Low Times. DAVE SEGAL


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