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Friday, July 27, 2012

Tonight in Music: Sometimes a Great Notion, SNAP! Five-Year Anniversary, Fatha Green & More

Posted by Lex Chase on Fri, Jul 27, 2012 at 3:20 PM


SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION: FELICE BROTHERS, DENNIS COFFEY, NATASHA KMETO, HOLCOMBE WALLER, MATTRESS
(Disjecta, 8371 N Interstate) The Sometimes a Great Notion Festival hopes to surprise and confuse. And it is kind of confusing, like, who is Metal Postcard Records? And why are Peaking Lights sharing a stage with the Felice Brothers? But with a stellar lineup with local favorites like Onuinu, White Fang, and more it should be great! ZIBBY PILLOTE


SNAP! FIVE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY: DR. ADAM, COLIN JONES
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) For five years Snap! has been snapping your ass on the dance floor with bona fide ass-waggling hits from the '90s! Join 'em tonight at the Snap! '90s Dance Party: Fifth Year Anniversary, and wiggle on down with turntablists Dr. Adam, Colin Jones, and Spies Like Us—plus a '90s-style costume contest! WM. STEVEN HUMPHREY



E*ROCK, FATHA GREEN, UNICORN DOMINATION, BOY FUNK, HARD POWER USA, MATTHEW HELLER & THE CLEVER
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) At Fatha Green's 30th birthday bash, there will be dark, innovative electronic music from the multi-faceted E*Rock, who is, among other creative and culturally cultivating projects, responsible for the Audio Dregs label. This guy knows what he's doing, even if he's doing it all. And birthday boy Fatha Green (of Purple and Green) is a performer in the true sense. His passionate, soulful vocals—paired with futuristic, funky R&B beats and more energy than one person should legally be allowed to possess—has been known to liberate the most stoic arm-crossing showgoers into becoming dancing machines. There are few local shows that I feel fit Branx as a venue, but this is one of them. ROCHELLE HUNTER


TALKATIVE, FANNO CREEK, OLD AGE
(Kelly's Olympian, 426 SW Washington) Where Fanno Creek's 2011 Green Houses EP treaded the peppy acoustic academia of Simon and Garfunkel while experimenting with strings and shakers, their new release is, terrifically, more stylistically varied. There's something both wholesome and dangerous on the five-song End Is End EP; intro track "The Greatest" finds a familiar route for the Portland trio—all smart acoustic finger-plucking and snappy melody—only to rip apart near the end with J. Mascis-worthy fret shredding. At its best, End Is End recalls Oh, Inverted World-era indie-pop—no small accolade considering the canonical merits of the Shins' early oeuvre. But even when Fanno Creek meanders in and out of familiar territory, theirs remains a singularly textured, fun, dance-y marriage of feel-good melodic rock. RYAN J. PRADO


PITCHFORK MOTORWAY, THE LOVESORES, THE FOOD, THE DECLINERS, STUMBLEBUM
(Club 21, 2035 NE Glisan) The Lovesores are the logical successor to '90s garage punk outfit the Humpers, and not just because herpes is one of the more typical outcomes of humping. They share a frontman, Scott Drake, whose vocals sound just as deliberate and pissed off as they did on the Humpers' handful of albums, the last of which harkens back to 1998. If you are fond of declaring that the Pixies were the Last Good Band before it all went to shit, the Lovesores' debut 7-inch might shut you up. Meanwhile, Pitchfork Motorway sound more like the '80s—say, if the Ramones were dragged at high speeds behind a domestic GTO down a gravel road. Maybe they think so too: "GTO" is the name of the first song on Heading West, Pitchfork Motorway's second LP. It's a tight collection of fast, boozy songs within which chain smokers indulge their affinity for call-and-response. REBECCA WILSON


THE DEAD BEAT, SURFS DRUGS, K-TEL '79, THE GHOST EASE
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) K-Tel '79 have got to be one of the most hard-working local bands you haven't been fortunate enough to hear from—yet. They just played a set at PDX Pop Now!, but can typically be found sharing stages any night of the week at rock venues and house parties around town. The trio creates tight-knit rock on a spectrum that ranges from lackadaisical surf to fast-paced, punk face-melters. Jason Aquarien delivers finely honed, backbeat-setting syncopation on drums, Paul Billy Sobiech brings squealing guitar licks and a trebled warble, and Elena Kettwig is a spitfire of a bass player who contributes mod-inspired vocal echo. Tracks posted on Bandcamp provide a scintillating taste of what's to come; word is that they've just finished recording an album, due for mastering and release. It's only a matter of time before the whole town becomes enamored—best get on board. MARANDA BISH


ANGRY SAMOANS, 13 SCARS, RUM REBELLION, PDX PUNK ROCK COLLECTIVE
(Plan B, 1305 SE 8th) Occasionally, rock 'n' roll journalists get out from behind their keyboards and show how things should be done, as opposed to just writing about it. In the early '80s, "Metal Mike" Saunders, the rock writer who might have coined the term "heavy metal" in a 1970 Humble Pie review for Rolling Stone, brought forth a stripped-down skate-punk attack with his own band, the Angry Samoans. While never achieving such household-name status as Black Flag, the Samoans came ripping out of the San Fernando Valley with timeless jams like "Lights Out." Now, 20 some odd years later, they're still at it, as fast, sloppy, and especially angry as ever. KEVIN DIERS

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