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Saturday, August 18, 2012

Tonight in Music: Denver, Poliça, Jel/DJ Abilities & More

Posted by Lex Chase on Sat, Aug 18, 2012 at 9:58 AM


DENVER, BEAR AND MOOSE, BARNA HOWARD
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Denver.


POLIÇA, SUPREME CUTS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Poliça make grooving downtempo tunes with singer Channy Leaneagh's woozy Auto-Tuned vocals as the central focus. Like Leaneagh and band co-founder Ryan Olson's previous stuff with Minneapolis slowdance "supergroup"/collective Gayngs, it's formulaic and at times repetitive, but executed well enough to be mostly enjoyable. Openers Supreme Cuts get the edge here, though, for their moody, chopped-sample beats that constantly shift tempos and textures. Though their recent debut LP Whispers in the Dark is getting most of the (deserved) attention, the Chicago duo's previous Trouble 10-inch, remixes, and forays into rap production—see their upcoming collaborative album with Barbadian rapper Haleek Maul, Chrome Lips—show that their sound goes even deeper than that. MIKE RAMOS


JEL, DJ ABILITIES, TOPE, CLOUDY OCTOBER, STEWART VILLAIN, VOID PEDAL, ZAVALA, CRUSHCON7
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) DJ Abilities and Jel are two prominent hiphop producers (of Rhymesayers and Anticon, respectively) who emphasize performance and live production. These button-pushing, sample-scratching, fader-flapping geniuses come together again—after their short-lived Deep Puddle Dynamics stint—to tour together doing solo and collaborative sets. Get there early enough for great local emcees Tope and Cloudy October, and a beat set by Stewart Villain. This guy has a beautiful style, especially the ambient, laidback beats on his instrumental album Leftovers. ROCHELLE HUNTER


DIGITAL LEATHER, DENIZENZ, SICK SECRETS, GHOST POWER
(East End, 203 SE Grand) Denizenz, a gloriously noisy post-pop-punk band that has been gracing stages around town for the past couple years, has not established a strong internet presence. We're left with a few blurry videos, some old fuzzy recordings, and a trail of show dates reaching back into the previous decade, but from these artifacts one can get a sense of the band's essence: hysterical, howling vocals, garage-rock-style snarls of guitar, skittery keys, and steady drumbeats. One rad track titled "Ideas" commences with a shriek before the vocalist descends into a clever, scathing diatribe, stating, "I've got a light bulb like Thomas Edison," then demanding, "Give me ideas/I want your ideas!" I've got one for them, about getting their shit together online, but something tells me these guys may not give a fuck. MARANDA BISH


INTERNATIONAL POP OVERTHROW: THE ECSTATICS, RAMUNE ROCKET 3, BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS, THE CRY, THROWBACK SUBURBIA, QUEUED UP
(Mt. Tabor Theater, 4811 SE Hawthorne) The International Pop Overthrow festival—which, I should mention, takes its name from Material Issue's excellent debut LP—began in 1998 as a means of showcasing up-and-coming Los Angeles-based power-pop artists. Over the years it has gradually expanded to multiple other big(gish) cities, including Portland. And while it's an overlooked facet of this city's music scene (why wouldn't it be?), PDX definitely has its fair share of stellar Beatles-influenced pop acts. Saturday night's lineup looks particularly killer: there are PDX pure pop mainstays Blue Skies for Black Hearts, whose most recent LP Embracing the Modern Age was one of the most significant contributions to the genre in recent memory, the irresistibly retro Queued Up, and Exploding Hearts holograms the Cry. Prepare to meet a lot of weirdoes who claim the best band to ever come out of Portland was the Hudson Brothers. (Elliott Who?) MORGAN TROPER


KAYO DOT, THRONES, HANG THE OLD YEAR
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Kayo Dot is a band of multi-instrumentalists led by accomplished experimental musician Toby Driver. The ever-changing Brooklyn-based band has evolved over the last decade to release six studio albums, and while band members have come and gone, the progressive aesthetic that underlies the band's philosophy has always been present. Self-described as "dark, cinematic, and dream-like," their style gives the listener ample opportunity to fall into a kaleidoscopic world of sound that, via reinterpretation, ends up quite far from where it began. CHRISTINA BROUSSARD

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