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Wednesday, September 12, 2012

Tonight in Music: Parenthetical Girls, Sam Green, Dwight Yoakam and Animal Eyes

Posted by Lex Chase on Wed, Sep 12, 2012 at 10:46 AM


PARENTHETICAL GIRLS, GOLDEN RETRIEVER, CLASSICAL REVOLUTION
(Washington High School, 531 SE 14th) Read our article on Parenthetical Girls.


SAM GREEN, YO LA TENGO: THE LOVE SONG OF R. BUCKMINSTER FULLER
(Washington High School, 531 SE 14th) Filmmaker Sam Green co-directed 2002's fascinating The Weather Underground. Nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary, the film dug into the weird, dangerous world of the wannabe hippie revolutionaries who decided to overthrow the government. Now Green's found a subject just as interesting in the bizarre, brilliant R. Buckminster Fuller, the inventor, architect, and professional weirdo who attempted to change the world through re-imagining the way we can and should live, from the mass utilization of geodesic domes to living in autonomous buildings. (Fuller called his version of a futuristic, self-contained home the "Dymaxion House," and I am furious I am not sitting in one right now.) For the "live documentary" The Love Song of R. Buckminster Fuller, Green will pull from images, TEDTalks-inspired narration, and—hot damn!—a live score performed by Yo La Tengo. Prediction: This is going to rule, and it is going to make all of us feel like tiny imbeciles who should be doing far more with our flimsy little lives, and I cannot wait. ERIK HENRIKSEN


DWIGHT YOAKAM
(Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W Burnside) In a 2002 interview with Larry King, Johnny Cash claimed that Dwight Yoakam was his favorite country singer. Coming from one of the pinnacle icons in mainstream country culture, the compliment stands as both praise and appraisal. Yoakam, however, wasn't always in such bright light. When he first started in Nashville during the early '80s, his new revival of honky-tonk country was rejected in favor of the trending pop-based variety. After leaving the scene that denied him, he ended up in Los Angeles where he shared bills with punk bands like the Blasters and X during the start of his West Coast career. Twenty-five million records of Yoakam's have sold since then, but even if you can't tell upon initially listening to a track like "Guitars Cadillacs," the ethic is historically ingrained: Yoakam is country's punk. JONATHAN MAGDALENO


ANIMAL EYES, FANNO CREEK, PIGEONS, DJ HUNNYPRAWNZ
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) Exciting things are afoot for Animal Eyes and Fanno Creek. They are embarking on a tour of Western states, and this first show of the tour celebrates new releases for each: an Animal Eyes EP and Fanno Creek's new 19-track album Live from the Banana Stand. In many ways, the two bands are each other's perfect folk-rock foil: where AE is rambunctious and funky, FC is quietly dramatic; AE is ebullient, FC is introspective; AE has an accordion, but then FC has those harmonies. What they have in common is roots that run deep in the Northwest, literal and aesthetic, and they are both easy to like—the kind of music you want to hear on a sunny weekend afternoon in the backyard. REBECCA WILSON

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