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Friday, February 22, 2013

Tonight in Music: Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside, Eat Skull, Luz Elena Mendoza/Edna Vazquez & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Feb 22, 2013 at 10:59 AM


SALLIE FORD AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE, AGESANDAGES
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) Read our article on Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside.


EAT SKULL, THE WOOLEN MEN, STILL CAVES, LITTLE PILGRIMS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Eat Skull.


LUZ ELENA MENDOZA, EDNA VAZQUEZ, LEO
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) The two most prominent Latina voices in Portland music, Luz Elena Mendoza and Edna Vazquez, team up this evening for what's sure to be a spectacular night of mariachi-based music blended with everything from folk to indie rock to witchy soul. One part old-world and two parts new, this is some of the best original songwriting you'll find on stage tonight. MARJORIE SKINNER


WORKS: LOST LANDER, THE ALIALUJAH CHOIR
(The Old Church, 1422 SW 11th) Do you ever want to listen to some awesome music, see some local art, and support homeless youth all at once? Well... for the event Works, the Intown Church and People's Art of Portland are presenting an evening of music from Lost Lander and the Alialujah Choir, alongside a showcase of local artists' works, and a portion of the proceeds go to p:ear; a nonprofit that mentors homeless youth. ROSE FINN


RARE MONK, NINJA TURTLE NINJA TIGER, BIKE THIEF
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) The opening track of Sleep/Attack, the new album from Portland band Rare Monk, has all the ingredients you could want: a rocking but dance-friendly beat, a hooky melody, a squiggly synth solo or two, and harmony vocals up the wazoo. As good as that track is, Rare Monk saves their surprises for later in the album, blending shreddy guitar rawk with folky violin and nice-guy harmonies. It all totally works, and Rare Monk are skilled at putting these disparate elements together, while offering something dance-floor friendly to boot. Produced by Skyler Norwood and with striking cover artwork by Chris Bigalke, Death by Proxy is not just the first full-length album from Rare Monk, but the announcement of their arrival as a fully loaded Swiss-army knife of a band, capable of most anything you'd need 'em to do. NED LANNAMANN


THE RESIDENTS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE Cesar E. Chavez) The first lyrics the Residents officially released into the world on their 1972 debut single were "Santa Dog's a Jesus fetus," and in the decades since, the band has not paused in their ceaseless propagation of similarly derisive, acerbic, and playful communications to humankind. Across a maddening amount of material that spans every possible type of media and format, the Residents have slyly employed the trappings of popular music—severely bending its limits in the process—in spectacles that radically, artfully reflect cultural institutions like religion, commerce, and politics, and expose their foundations of absurdity. When the band's earliest efforts struggled to find support from traditional outlets, counterculture outposts—including KBOO and Music Millennium, locally—helped them to develop their audience, one so enduring and loyal that tonight's show celebrates their 40th anniversary with the "Wonder of Weird" tour. MARANDA BISH


GRAVE BABIES, VICE DEVICE, TYRANTS
(Record Room, 8 NE Killingsworth) Seattle's Grave Babies would probably prefer not to be filed under goth or industrial, which is perfectly understandable. Their second full-length, Crusher (out on Hardly Art), is a lot of things: morbidly discordant, toneless, beat-heavy, and often brooding. It's not, however, particularly gloomy, even when it's trying its hardest to be. The band somehow bridges—and not always entirely seamlessly—the tenets of sludgy metal with a dark pop not unlike a drugged-up Tears for Fears. Mashing danceable beats, fuzzy, chant-like vocals, and hook-lite melodies within a guitar-heavy miasma, Grave Babies appear to be appealing to a rough hybrid of all the scenes they wish they didn't have to. That Crusher is a pretty decent record of moping rock makes any expectation of categorization more or less moot. RYAN J. PRADO

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