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Sunday, April 14, 2013

Tonight in Music: Bender, Organ Grinders, Bad Religion & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sun, Apr 14, 2013 at 9:51 AM


BENDER: BIG EYES, BLACK BANANAS & MORE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) The Bender has left its home at Slabtown, but all else for the annual punk-garage-rawk fest remains the same. For three solid days—including a matinee show on Saturday and a special exclusive show on Sunday for those with weekend wristbands—stuff your ears with the likes of Monoshock, the Cheater Slicks, Black Bananas, the Cynics, and tons more. NED LANNAMANN Read our guide to the Bender.


ORGAN GRINDERS: HÄXAN: JAGGERY, WALTER SICKERT AND THE ARMY OF BROKEN TOYS
(Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy) The 1922 silent film Häxan, made by Danish director Benjamin Christensen, was intended to be a documentary depicting witchcraft, demons, and Satanic rites, but the result is a beyond-strange, visually stunning horror film that remains shocking today. Tonight, two bands provide a live score as part of the Organ Grinders film series. NL


BAD RELIGION, THE BRONX, POLAR BEAR CLUB
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Bad Religion's 16th(!) album, True North, is tough to distinguish from any release since ace studio drummer Brooks Wackerman joined the ranks in 2002 on The Process of Belief. The band, now in its fifth decade together(!!) is undoubtedly a pole-setter for contemporary punk rock, and probably more importantly, a lightning rod for clear, analytical lyrical dissertations on everything from socio-economics, theology, American politics, and more, thanks to frontman Greg Graffin's enormo-brain. The LP's single, "Fuck You" (timing is everything; forget you, Cee-Lo!), retains the band's layered vocal harmonies, blistering pace, in-your-face guitars and smart, biting commentary; the difference is that it's not really very dangerous anymore. But dude! It's Bad Religion! Make sure to get there early to witness the return of the Bronx, too; their new album, The Bronx (good luck finding the right one; they're all self-titled) is sort of dangerous-sounding. RYAN J. PRADO


SUFFOCATION, EXHUMED, JUNGLE ROT, RINGS OF SATURN, ADMIRON, LORD OF WAR, ASSYRIA
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) You know you're getting old when you start sentences with the words "back in my day," but honestly, seven bands on one bill that's not at an outdoor venue with elephant ears and overflowing port-o-potties? Back in my day, three bands was enough and four was CRAZY! I don't even think the youngsters these days have that kind of energy, considering they poke those iThingys all day instead of running and jumping. I must be going through a mid-metal life crisis or something. Suffocation's latest brutalizer, Pinnacle of Bedlam, definitely tingles my death-metal senses as much as their classic Effigy of the Forgotten, and Exhumed's triumphant return of late is thoroughly welcomed, but I just don't think I have the stamina for six-plus hours of metal under one roof. Unless there's a two-hour intermission with a comfy couch I can nap on? ARIS WALES


SOUL'D OUT: BOOKER T. JONES, CHARLIE HUNTER, CARLTON JACKSON
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) You know Booker T. Jones' name from Booker T. & the M.G.'s, and as the organist that defines modern-day blues and soul. On his most recent album The Road from Memphis, Jones collaborated with Sharon Jones, Lou Reed, and more legendary artists. His music is timeless and distinct, from the infamous song, "Green Onions"—which he wrote in high school(!)—to "Progress," featuring vocals by Jim James. Jones is joined by guitarist Charlie Hunter (Garage à Trois) and drummer Carlton Jackson for their first-ever show as a trio. RACHEL MILBAUER Read our guide to the Soul'd Out Music Festival.


AGALLOCH, SUTEKH HEXEN
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Over the past decade black metal has moved past being a soundtrack to the illegal extracurricular activities of groups of Norwegian misfits. A lot of that change has to do with John Haughm and his longtime Portland metal band Agalloch, which he formed back in 1995. In that time they've remained constant, if not exactly prolific, without compromising their sound. Agalloch's Faustian Echoes EP—which consists of one 21-minute song—is the most theatrical piece of music Agalloch has recorded. It's as bookish as it is black. Agalloch's longevity is a testament to a band that has carved out a name for itself without actually carving its name into anything, or anybody. MARK LORE


GRRRL FRONT FEST
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) It's been far too long since I've been grrrled at, but that's about to be fixed: The Slabtown Grrrl Front Festival is four all-ages days of talented ladies in music (Busy Scissors, Litto Fox) and stand-up comedy (Bri Pruett, Marcia Belsky), plus an art show, zine workshop, roller derby sign-ups, a demo for a riot grrrl-themed videogame, a clothing swap benefit, and the kitchen sink. MARJORIE SKINNER

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