This Week in the Mercury


Friday, April 26, 2013

Tonight in Music: Marnie Stern, NoMeansNo, Absu & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:27 AM


MARNIE STERN, SISU, SWAHILI
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Marnie Stern.


NOMEANSNO, FORD PIER, DIRTCLODFIGHT, BISON BISON
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Read our article on NoMeansNo.


ABSU, RITUAL NECROMANCY, L'ACEPHALE, PLEASURE CROSS
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) Read our article on Absu.


GHOST B.C., IDES OF GEMINI, LORD DYING
(Wonder Ballroom 128 NE Russell) The anonymous Swedes who make up Ghost BC (formerly just plain Ghost) shroud themselves in robes and masks befitting a satanic liturgy, but despite all their evil iconography, their hard rock isn't as scary as all that. Skirting just shy of metal, these nameless ghouls set the mood with soaring guitars, churchlike organs, and arena-sized melodies. NED LANNAMANN

Meditation is a very personal thing. To accompany the inward journey, some might use incense, or acupuncture, or whale songs, while others might prefer morose, crawling, down-tuned doom. For those, Ides of Gemini could be the perfect soundtrack for peering through your third eye. The band's style of doom oozes ethereal qualities, seemingly aiming to melt your subconscious. Sera Timms' ghostly, angelic vocals swell like an ancient chant, hypnotically gliding over the methodically slow pace of drummer Kelly Johnston, the lurching gloom of Timms' bass lines, and the guitar licks of (world-class metal journalist) J. Bennett. Don't shoegaze too hard, because Ides of Gemini could send you to an extremely saddened state of nirvana. ARIS WALES


TRANSIT, SEAHAVEN, ALL GET OUT, YOUNG STATUES
(Backspace, 115 NW 5th) Boston-based pretty boys Transit are ridiculous. They embody the sort of histrionic self-indulgence that drove the emo/pop-punk synthesis of the early '00s completely over the top by the end of the decade. But—and maybe this is just because I really am a sucker for teenage poetry and comprehensively embarrassing melodrama—this music actually does make me feel things. Take "Outbound," the saccharine, irresistible-as-fudge acoustic closer to the group's 2009 EP Stay Home, for instance. It's corny and hackneyed, for sure, but there's also something undeniably real about it. Pop? Definitely. Punk? Your grandparents might find it mildly subversive. MORGAN TROPER

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