This Week in the Mercury


Tuesday, November 19, 2013

Tonight in Music: Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin, Bill Callahan & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Tue, Nov 19, 2013 at 10:43 AM


SOMEONE STILL LOVES YOU BORIS YELTSIN, ARMY NAVY
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin.


BILL CALLAHAN, MICK TURNER
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Bill Callahan, who recorded 13 LPs under the moniker Smog before reverting to his own name, could very well be the most aberrant singer/songwriter to emerge from the '90s, a decade already characterized by unusual, exceptional indie folkies. He's also an extremely polarizing entity—Callahan's monotonous, practically tuneless drawl (he makes Mark Kozelek sound like Frankie Valli) is an extremely inaccessible affect, one that unfortunately prevents some listeners from cutting to the deeply emotional, melancholy fiber of Callahan's songs. His latest, Dream River, is as consistently evocative and elegant as his very best. MORGAN TROPER Also see My, What a Busy Week!


STEVE AOKI, BORGORE, WAKA FLOCKA FLAME, KEYS N KRATES, KRYOMAN
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Before Electric Daisy Festival became a tween stomping ground, and before EDM became a blanket pejorative—before Skrillex, let's say—Steve Aoki built the loudest underground rave scene of the 21st century. Aoki's Dim Mak label stands as testament to music production as brand empire (perhaps not unlike the way his father, Rocky Aoki, started the Benihana restaurant chain). Aoki emerged from the LA suburbs to stand in the vanguard of globalized electronic dance music; joining his carnival of mischief at the Roseland tonight is Waka Flocka Flame, the rap game's most ebullient wordsmith. A protegé of Gucci Mane, Flocka goes hard in the paint as probably the most socially conscious lyricist among the trap-inflected new illuminati. WYATT SCHAFFNER


THOMAS DOLBY: THE INVISIBLE LIGHTHOUSE
(Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 NE Alberta) After writing and producing some of the most beautiful pop of the 1980s (his own The Flat Earth, Prefab Sprout's Two Wheels Good) and touring the world as an electronic-music guru, Thomas Dolby returns to the stage with an ambitious new multimedia work. Described as "part film, part concert, part transmedia event," The Invisible Lighthouse features Dolby performing a live narration and musical score in front of the titular film, which was shot and edited by Dolby, and evocatively chronicles an island lighthouse in Britain. Additional drama will be supplied by foley artist/musician/sound designer Blake Leyh. DAVID SCHMADER

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