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Saturday, January 11, 2014

Tonight in Music: Thao and the Get Down Stay Down, UFOFBI, Long Hallways & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, Jan 11, 2014 at 10:10 AM


THAO AND THE GET DOWN STAY DOWN, SONNY AND THE SUNSETS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) I first saw folk rockers Thao & the Get Down Stay Down at laidback hippie-fest Pickathon, and I was not prepared. There's verve and soul in Thao's music, but there's a twisting, vibrant energy, too—and that's why seeing her live is so goddamn fun. ERIK HENRIKSEN


UFOFBI, THE WOOLEN MEN, SPOOKIES
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) The tagline for new record label Space Cassette is "pop music by the unpopular," a praiseworthy sentiment if ever there was one. Tonight, the folks behind this imprint—former Shaky Hands members Mayhaw Hoons and Alex Arrowsmith, with the Minders' Martyn Leaper—bring that notion to glorious life with this show. It's a celebration of the release of a new split 7-inch featuring the ragged garage pop of Spookies and the ever prolific Woolen Men, and the night also includes a likeminded batch of freaks from Stockholm known as UFOFBI. The trio call to mind the tossed-off, lo-fi sonic experiments that would cut through the rock triumphalism on early GBV releases. UFOFBI calls it "dreamtrash," I call it my new favorite band. ROBERT HAM


LONG HALLWAYS, APPENDIXES, MONTHS
(Foggy Notion, 3416 N Lombard) Most of the first track on Long Hallways' new album, Live from Dystopia, paints a gorgeous, mellow, walking-paced picture of this two-year-old Portland band. "David the Lion" is a churning chunk of post-rock spiked with interstellar guitar explorations that climb ever heavenward as the song gains momentum; Explosions in the Sky—an acknowledged influence, per Long Hallways' Facebook profile—would be proud. But in its last 30 seconds, the song detours into a quick post-punk-ish groove that foreshadows the more aggressive sound of the rest of the album. From there, Dystopia bounces around the world of instrumental, experimental rock, never passing on an opportunity to ride jazzy bass lines, crescendoing guitars and occasional electronic embellishments to an emotional climax. On Saturday, Long Hallways will celebrate the album's digital release—they'll have download cards!—at Foggy Notion with shoegaze group Appendixes and the unGoogleable band Months. BEN SALMON


THRONES, SURVIVAL KNIFE, DANIEL MENCHE, DJ DENNIS DREAD
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) Daniel Menche is nothing if not prolific. The Portland musician has released a stockpile of material over the past two decades, creating languid and lurking soundscapes that can corrode your inner circuitry. It pairs well with choice chemicals. Menche shares the bill with shrapnel-makers Survival Knife and Joe Preston's doom-personified Thrones. Survival Knife (featuring Justin Trosper and Brandt Sandeno of Unwound) released a pair of 7-inches on Sub Pop and Kill Rock Stars last year that are filled with hooks and plenty of other twists and turns to keep you off balance. And Thrones continue to sporadically release material while swallowing up cities and decimating eardrums—more importantly, Preston is celebrating 20 years under the moniker. Earplugs and a diaper recommended. MARK LORE


OLD RUSSIAN NEW YEAR: CHERVONA
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) If you can't get enough of that new-year smell, take the multicultural route and celebrate them all. For the eighth year running, the Eastern European-inspired Chervona is celebrating Russian Old New Year with music, Russian food and vodka, an awards ceremony that highlights the most bizarre Russian headlines of the year, and more. MARJORIE SKINNER


OREGON SYMPHONY, EMANUEL AX: BACH AND STRAUSS
(Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 SW Broadway) There's a shit-ton of reasons to be stoked about this particular show: Beethoven's Symphony No. 8 on the program; Emanuel Ax at the piano; Carlos Kalmar atop the podium. I could certainly devote all these words to any of those supreme joys, but here's a little secret: It doesn't matter what the fuck is on the program, or who the hell happens to be at the piano, or atop the goddamned podium. Why? Because after witnessing every classical concert the Oregon Symphony's performed the past three seasons, the one constant that can always be counted on is the band itself, in all its 76-piece glory. In this town, where any inked yahoo with a washboard can call himself a "musician" when he's not whipping up a mocha soy latte, it's utterly inspiring to behold these crazy, brave masters of music on the Schnitzer stage, who week in and week out guarantee blown minds and broken hearts. Resolve to start the new year off right by witnessing brilliance for once in your worthless life. ANGRY SYMPHONY GUY


THREE FOR SILVER, WILL KIMBROUGH, BERGERETTE
(Secret Society, 116 NE Russell) The first time I saw Will Kimbrough, he was playing guitar with Todd Snider and opening for Jimmy Buffett in front of tens of thousands. The last time I saw Kimbrough, he was at the old Berbati's Pan, playing alongside Rodney Crowell as Johnny Cash in Crowell's "I Walk the Line (Revisited)." Kimbrough's worked with Guy Clark, Rosanne Cash, John Prine, the Jayhawks, Emmylou Harris, Mavis Staples, and on and on. He's an all-star's all-star. All of which risks overshadowing his solo work, which is consistently as good as any in the genre. Three for Silver, with Lucas Warford and his five-string bass banjo, headline. Opener Bergerette sings, in its words, "French pop music straight out of 700 years ago." RYAN WHITE


RABBITS, GAYTHEIST, JONNY X AND THE GROADIES, POLST, THE GOUT
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Gaytheist's last album Hold Me... But Not So Tight was easily one of my favorite local releases of last year. Coming just eight short months after their equally excellent 2012 offering, Stealth Beats, the noise-rock trio delivered the textbook definition of a one-two punch. I'm able to keep coming back to these releases because it's just so refreshing to hear music as heavy as this paired up with vocals that can effortlessly be deciphered and appreciated right out of the gate. Sure, guitarist/vocalist Jason Rivera's lyrics are packed with wit and humor, but they also have the ability to strike a serious subject with laser accuracy. Tonight Gaytheist shares the stage with the chaotic sludge-rock sounds of Rabbits for an all-ages affair that should feel like a bit of a reprise of last year's delightful Eolian Empire cassette compilation release shows. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

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