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Wednesday, January 29, 2014

Tonight in Music: Ryan VanDordrecht, the Autumn Defense, the Binary Marketing Show & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Wed, Jan 29, 2014 at 12:55 PM


RYAN VANDORDRECHT, COOPER AND THE JAM, SPIRIT LAKE
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Formerly of the bands Castella and Sidestar, Ryan VanDordrecht has readied a solo debut, and Beast of Love reveals the songwriter's talents in straightforward, admirable fashion. Nothing on the record heats up past a low boil, but the laidback, rootsy affair works perfectly well on its own terms, particularly on the twangy "Great American Life" and the boozy barroom slowburn of "I Ain't Coming Home Tonight." Pop smarts are imbued into almost every track, sidestepping the earnest singer/songwriter qualities that could have turned Beast of Love into a navel gazer. Instead, it's a grower, and the re-introduction of a worthwhile local talent. NED LANNAMANN


THE AUTUMN DEFENSE, MELVILLE, BARNA HOWARD
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The Autumn Defense, led by John Sirratt and Pat Sansone (members of Wilco), makes the kind of twangy, slide-guitar-centric sounds that make country music okay. The duo are on tour for their fifth album together, the newly released Fifth, which was made between busy tours with other projects. This seems like a less than ideal way to make a record, but there is a sense of full, bursting expression in these songs, like they couldn't stand being held back any longer. If you're in the mood for some American pop sensibility, get ahold of this lineup, with local folk rockers Melville to round it out. RACHEL MILBAUER



THE BINARY MARKETING SHOW, TROUBLED BY INSECTS, CHIFFON, AMENTA ABIOTO
(Habesha Lounge, 801 NE Broadway) The members of the Binary Marketing Show don't like to attach themselves or their musical output to any particular place. Though Abram Morphew and Bethany Carder are now residing in our rainy city, they seem to prefer to think of themselves as nomads, with their sounds sopping up influences from all corners of the world. It's the platonic ideal for any band, and this experimental duo expresses it through some truly melted-ice-cream visions of our technology-centric future. Their releases have all exhibited a fascination with circuit bending (customizing an over-the-counter electronic device like a Gameboy into a musical instrument) and verging on pop, but only occasionally giving themselves over to anything straightforward. Mercurial and wise, this is twitch music for the Twitter generation. ROBERT HAM


INTO IT OVER IT, THE WORLD IS A BEAUTIFUL PLACE AND I AM NO LONGER AFRAID TO DIE, A GREAT BIG PILE OF LEAVES
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) If you follow music trends, you might have read about twinklecore sometime in the last couple of months. In case you're unfamiliar, it's a fancy and reprehensibly idiotic term being ascribed to a legion of bands influenced by "twinkly" mid-'90s emo (à la Braid, the Promise Ring, and the Kinsella brothers' oeuvre).┬áThe World Is a Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid to Die are usually the first band referenced in any article about this so-called resurgence (which is part reality, and part slow news year for a desperate music press), and it's annoying because they're far from its best practitioner. But it's easy to see what's allowed them to make the biggest impression on out-of-touch music writers attempting to make sense of a scene they have no involvement in: the pretentiously long name that's nearly impossible to curtail comfortably; the sensationalist, overtly emotional subject matter; and their overall musical and aesthetic humorlessness. MORGAN TROPER

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