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Sunday, February 2, 2014

Tonight in Music: White Denim, Reggie and the Full Effect, Soulfly

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sun, Feb 2, 2014 at 10:19 AM


WHITE DENIM, CLEAR PLASTIC MASKS
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) With equal footing in blues rock and psychedelia, White Denim is full of moments that sound parallel to familiar, but just when you think you're predicting what comes next, songs like those on the new LP, Corsicana Lemonade, shift in more unique directions. And onward we go, into the soulful and exploratory. MARJORIE SKINNER


REGGIE AND THE FULL EFFECT, DADS, PENTIMENTO
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) I was a little surprised to learn that Reggie and the Full Effect are still around, but lo and behold: a new album and tour. The brainchild of former Get Up Kids keyboardist and Coalesce drummer James Dewees (he's also done tours of duty in New Found Glory and My Chemical Romance), Reggie released a comeback album of sorts in November, No Country for Old Musicians. This comes five years after Last Stop: Crappy Town, which was heavier and more serious than usual and was followed by chatter about a farewell tour. The Kickstarter-funded No Country is something of a return to form: emo-y pop-punk songs about silly stuff interspersed with skits and "special guest" appearances by Dewees' alter egos, the German industrial metal band Common Denominator and the British electro-pop group Fluxuation. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN


SOULFLY, AMERICAN ROULETTE, CHRONOLOGICAL INJUSTICE, BETRAYED BY WEAKNESS
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) At this point Soulfly might be tossed off as an oldie by younger, hipper heshers. And that's fine. Frontman Max Cavalera has been at it a long time, and let's just say not all of his post-Sepultura work has been on point. Soulfly's latest offering, Savages, does have some pretty great moments (the album cover art is not one of them). But "Bloodshed" and "Cannibal Holocaust" are absolute slayers. Then there's "Ayatollah of Rock 'n' Rolla" which, despite some stoney guest vocals from Clutch's Neil Fallon, sips and slides in its own silliness. The band has always done its damnedest to remain current (including some ill-advised lapses into nu-metal), but this time around it's all for the better. MARK LORE

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