This Week in the Mercury

Feel the Warmer

Music

Feel the Warmer

La Hell Gang's Chilean Psych


Out of the Woodwork

Music

Out of the Woodwork

Courtney Barnett Makes Her Mark



Thursday, February 20, 2014

Tonight in Music: Sun Kil Moon, Propagandhi, Albatross & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Thu, Feb 20, 2014 at 12:56 PM


SUN KIL MOON
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Read our article on Sun Kil Moon.


PROPAGANDHI, THE FLATLINERS, WAR ON WOMEN
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Read our article on Propagandhi.


ALBATROSS, THE MORALS
(Clyde's Prime Rib, 5474 NE Sandy) Locally regarded as a time capsule of yesteryear elegance, and upholding a stoic loyalty to both '70s décor and the importance of a fine steak, Clyde's Prime Rib isn't exactly the type of joint you'd expect to see a rock band hold its record-release show. Then again, Albatross frontman Ryan Sollee isn't exactly a stranger to eyebrow-raising venues (his other project, the Builders and the Butchers, started off as a busking group). The lounge area of the restaurant has long hosted local jazz and R&B artists, but is untested in the rock vein—until tonight. They've chosen a fitting test sample with Albatross, whose self-titled debut is a gloomy, dramatic Americana smorgasbord that also features Wooden Indian Burial Ground's Paul Seely, and Cristina Cano from Sallie Ford's new band. The show is free, too. Dinner jacket optional. RYAN J. PRADO


OLD AGE, PAULO ZAPPOLI AND THE BREAK, NICK DELFFS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The boys of Old Age come to Portland frequently to shake us with their country swagger, to embrace us with their layered, gritty guitar and scratchy-howled vocals. They bring their twisted, sweet rock 'n 'roll and Beatlesque harmonies everywhere from the sweatiest house show to the Doug Fir, and tonight, they release their full-length, Wildlife, at Mississippi Studios. To say that boots will stomp and arms will flail would be an understatement, because their music hits you when you're least expecting it, unfurling a slow, sentimental love song before turning around to smack you with raw honesty. If you haven't seen them yet, catch them doing what they do best—raging on stage with new songs up their sleeves and whiskey in hand—with some killer opening bands to tie the night together. RACHEL MILBAUER


HOOKERS, DENVER, REGULAR MUSIC
(Kenton Club, 2025 N Kilpatrick) A triple bill of shreddy rock, saloon-door country, and analog synth jams is just what the doctor ordered. Hookers offer riff-ready boogie rock that'll trigger acid flashbacks, while Denver's rusty-knife country will have you watering down your whiskey with your own tears, and Regular Music's cosmic electricity will warm your cold android heart. All for free? This is going to be a blowout. NED LANNAMANN


PORTLAND JAZZ FESTIVAL: BRIAN BLADE AND THE FELLOWSHIP BAND
(Dolores Winningstad Theatre, 1111 SW Broadway) Since jazz sprang from New Orleans back in the days of bowlers and petticoats, the Crescent City has always hosted a rich tradition of jazz musicians. Brian Blade is no exception. Known for his clean, sharp drumming skills, Blade has studied and played with jazz greats like Ellis Marsalis and Harold Battiste, and has recorded with everybody from Joni Mitchell to Herbie Hancock to Bob Dylan. In 1998, Blade teamed up with the Fellowship, a group of friends who were also seasoned musicians, creating a sound and a dynamic that make listeners feel cool and sophisticated, like they're part of the party. The Portland Jazz Festival can't suck too much this year when Brian Blade and the Fellowship are at the helm of its opening night. ROSE FINN


LET IT WHIP: DAM-FUNK, REV SHINES, MAXX BASS, GWIZSKI, SEX LIFE DJS, KING TIM 33.3
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) After a few years of putting free mixes, remixes, demo tracks, digital singles, and other stray-funk ephemera out on the internet, the SoCal producer known as Dam-Funk came through with a couple of actual albums in the second half of 2013. One was called Higher, a glistening retro-space-funk collaboration with Steve Arrington, the singer from '70s Ohio funk band Slave. The other—released under the name 7 Days of Funk—paired Dam with rap icon Snoop Dogg for a laid-back, trunk-rattling tour of the best after-the-afterparty of the year. (It also reaffirmed that P-Funk-powered hiphop is Snoop's comfort zone; 7 Days' self-titled is his best effort in a long time.) Point is: It was nice to finally have real Dam-Funk recordings to enjoy, but ultimately, that won't matter much on Thursday when he arrives in Portland to reduce Holocene's Let It Whip dance party to a quivering puddle of bass-heavy boogie-funk. BEN SALMON

Comments (0)

Subscribe to this thread:

Comments are closed.

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy