This Week in the Mercury

Dangerous Lesions

Books

Dangerous Lesions

David Cronenberg's Cannibalism Debut Novel


Film Shorts

Film

Film Shorts

In Which We Hit It and Quit It



Saturday, March 15, 2014

Tonight in Music: XRAY Launch, Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks, Tada, Shirley Nanette & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, Mar 15, 2014 at 10:02 AM


XRAY LAUNCH: URAL THOMAS AND THE PAIN, OLD LIGHT, REV. SHINES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) As you can see in this week's Mercury feature story, the peeps behind XRAY.FM are busting their asses to start a new, progressive community radio station (chockfull of local music and political chitchat). Want to help AND have a blast? Attend this XRAY.FM launch party featuring Rev. Shines, Old Light, AND the eternally tail-waggin' old-school soul of Ural Thomas and the Pain. With this show, XRAY is off to a very good start. WM. STEVEN HUMPHREY Read our article on XRAY.FM.


STEPHEN MALKMUS AND THE JICKS, SUN FOOT
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our article on Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks.


TADA, KELLI SCHAEFER, OLD AGE
(Red & Black Café, 400 SE 12th) Read our article on Tada.


SHIRLEY NANETTE
(Heathman Hotel, 1001 SW Broadway) Read our article on Shirley Nanette.


HILLSTOMP, RIN TIN TIGER, ROOT JACK
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) During the decade or so that blues-punk duo Hillstomp have been worshipping at the altar of R.L. Burnside, they've managed to expand very little, despite deft musicianship from Henry Kammerer's skillful gee-tar and John Johnson's trashcan percussion. Their brand-new album, Portland, Ore, might be the moment all that changes. Although the duo still breaks into white lightning nouveau-blues on tunes like "Santa Fe Line," the emphasis is not on the player, but the game, with ear-catching, pensive epics like "The Cuckoo" offering more hallucinatory fare. Kammerer's banjo performance on "Undertow" is a feel-good change of pace in spite of the song's tale of a man's last thoughts before drowning. Kammerer and Johnson are still extremely capable of the bullhorn-vocaled, backporch blues-rock that made them such a formidable talent, and songs like "Henry Oh My Henry" are exemplary. This will not be the least bit boring. RYAN J. PRADO


BAYSIDE, FOUR YEAR STRONG, DAYLIGHT, MIXTAPES
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) The recent surge in popularity of rock music rooted in and/or inspired by the 1990s has swept up both young bands whose members grew up listening to Jimmy Eat World and Jets to Brazil, and older bands that started back then and have been at it ever since. Bayside, from Queens, New York, falls into the latter category. The quartet formed in 2000 and spent the next dozen years with its nose to the underground grindstone, releasing four albums via punk stalwart label Victory Records, playing tons of Vans Warped Tours, and otherwise touring its brains out, gathering legions of loyal fans, if not major mainstream success. The band's sixth album, Cult, is a reliably catchy collection of workmanlike pop-punk and emo that probably won't convert the masses, but should please those among us who've been eagerly awaiting a new Bayside record. BEN SALMON

Comments (0)

Subscribe to this thread:

Comments are closed.

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy