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Friday, March 28, 2014

Tonight in Music: Yob, Bun B, D.O.A. & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Mar 28, 2014 at 11:02 AM


YOB, GRAVES AT SEA, HOT VICTORY, DEATH GRAVE
(Branx, 320 SE 2nd) Oregon doomers Yob have recently finished work on album number seven (due out this fall on Neurot Recordings), and tonight you can see them perform brand-new material. They play alongside Graves at Sea, who are about to jump the sea for a Eurotour, and Hot Victory, who turn a two-person drum kit and a panoply of electric triggers into something with a huge and fascinating sound. NED LANNAMANN


BUN B, KIRKO BANGZ, TxE, YOUNG EASTLIN, DJ BIGGZ, GET IT SQUAD
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Bun B (AKA Bernard Freeman) secured his place in the pantheon of hiphop greats back in 2007, thanks to his sleek, smart verse in "International Players Anthem," the massive posse cut featuring his duo UGK and Atlanta's own Outkast. But, as all the great rappers do, this Houston-based rhymer has kept pushing upward, through the pain of losing his UGK partner Pimp C and into a solo career that has provided copious rewards. Freeman's most recent effort, Trill OG: The Epilogue, is, at times, bloated with guest appearances and bouts of sentimentality (an unused Pimp C verse pops up here, as does a tribute to the late Houston producer DJ Screw), but it still manages to galvanize, due to Freeman's sharp-edged verbiage and the lovingly tarnished funk that could only come from the Dirty South. ROBERT HAM


D.O.A., MILLIONS OF DEAD COPS, THE RANSOM, MR. PLOW
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) There are only a handful of hardcore bands more influential than Vancouver, BC's D.O.A. Gestating in the fertile late-'70s North American punk scene, the band's legendary 1981 LP Hardcore '81 is a foreshadowing of the blueprint for what thousands of budding leftist punx became. Led by the only remaining original member, Joey Shithead, D.O.A. have existed in fits and starts for more than 35 years, and have endured numerous lineup changes over albums as disparate as the reggae-tinged 1982 EP War on 45 and the thrash-tastic 1990 LP Murder. In the past year, D.O.A. have played several shows on their elongated farewell tour; lucky for us, tonight they play alongside Portland's equally legendary Millions of Dead Cops. This is basically your chance to check out the Punk Rock Super Bowl. RYAN J. PRADO


BRAIN SCRAPER, PLEASURE CROSS, ORDER OF THE GASH, HONDURAN
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) From this week's All Ages Action!: [Honduran are] colossal, confrontational, local power-violence heroes. "Pregnant Skeletons" might also be the best song title since "It's All About the Pentiums." MORGAN TROPER


THE STRYPES, THE CRY
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The nutty thing about Irish quartet the Strypes is they play the sort of overdriven blues rock and careening pub rock that their parents—or maybe even grandparents—probably worshipped. These mugs are young (16 to 18 years old), but their musical predilections are ancient. Apparently, unlike many of their peers, they don't give a damn about EDM, and that's kind of adorable. The Strypes would rather emulate British pub-rock badasses Dr. Feelgood or tear through the sort of moves that made director Michelangelo Antonioni want to cast the Yardbirds in Blow-Up. To pull off this sort of retro fetishizing, a band needs above-average chops and the kind of zealous conviction for the cause that's immune to criticism. The Strypes succeed on both counts. Here's hoping they go through a psychedelic phase next. DAVE SEGAL


CODY CHESNUTT, LIZ VICE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Atlanta-born Cody Chesnutt fits in perfectly with the recent music trend of neo-soul funk/rock. Chesnutt's classic soul voice rivals Aloe Blacc in smooth honey tonality, evident on his most recent album Landing on a Hundred, although most know him from the funky R&B cut "The Seed 2.0," which he wrote and performed with the Roots, and his appearance in Dave Chappelle's Block Party. Though Chesnutt can go a little heavy on the major chords, the richness of his voice, his socially conscious lyrics, and the funky guitar riffs create an uplifting sound that can connect you to a bygone soul era, and will probably make you shimmy and smile. ROSE FINN

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