This Week in the Mercury

All-Ages Action!

Music

All-Ages Action!

This Week's Best All-Ages Shows


Hungry Like the Wolf

Food and Drink

Hungry Like the Wolf

Fenrir Is the Little Cocktail Restaurant That (Mostly) Could



Saturday, April 5, 2014

Tonight in Music: Future Islands, Tender Age, Blockhead & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, Apr 5, 2014 at 10:05 AM


FUTURE ISLANDS, ED SCHRADER'S MUSIC BEAT, JASON URICK
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Future Islands.


TENDER AGE, WE MISS THE EARTH
(The Lovecraft, 421 SE Grand) Portland noise-pop foursome We Miss the Earth have been one of the most quietly prolific bands around. With their newest four-song EP, Destroyed, the band's fuzzy shoegaze hypnosis has only strengthened under the capable vision of Chris Koza and the Prids' Mistina La Fave. Destroyed begins with a wall of distortion on its title track, opening wide to swallow everything around it, while Koza's voice swims beautifully throughout. In turn, Tender Age's 7-inch "Anything/Mirrors"—released tonight on local upstart label Track and Field Records—is a thoroughly dreamy slice of dark pop, hemmed in by heavily reverbed, mesmerizing vocals by Tauna Leonardo. "Mirrors," in particular, paints an oddly reassuring glimpse of bleak realms, like a song you might hear in your head as you're drowning. That's meant to be a compliment. RYAN J. PRADO


BLOCKHEAD, YPPAH
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) To call someone "Twitter famous" is to damn with faint praise, but Twitter-famous hiphop producer Blockhead can certainly claim his share of real musical accomplishments. He rose to prominence in the early '00s thanks to production work for Aesop Rock; his moody, cinematic beats became a signature sound of underground rap's heyday. Since, Blockhead has released four solo albums of left-of-center boom-bap on the Ninja Tune label. But there's also a whole generation of folks discovering Blockhead through his Twitter feed, which is full of witty observations ("Musicians with corny sensibilities are often pretty successful cause, as it turns out, most people are pretty corny"), and his gut-busting blog, where he reviews rap demos, opines on up-and-coming emcees, and doles out advice "from a niche hiphop producer who dropped out of college." Blockhead is doing the web right: He doesn't seem like a social-media opportunist, but a regular dude. A regular dude who makes dope beats. BEN SALMON


DOUG WIESELMAN, MICHAEL HURLEY, BATTLE HYMNS AND GARDENS
(Information Warehouse, 411 SE 6th) Multi-instrumentalist Doug Wieselman has been a fixture of the New York music scene since the '80s, performing on clarinet or guitar alongside such luminaries as John Lurie and Yoko Ono. Lately he keeps a steady gig as a member of Antony Hegarty's backing band the Johnsons. Earlier this year, Wieselman took a step out on his own with the release of Water, an ornate collection of clarinet instrumentals that was his attempt to notate the music he heard in the trickling of rivers and the crash of ocean waves. This is hardly a placid new-age album, though. Its 10 tracks use looping melodies and tasteful effects to approximate the sensation of a constantly evolving natural world. ROBERT HAM


DUMPSTER BURGER, WITH THE SHADES DOWN, MOIST MONEY, WORMBAG
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) From All-Ages Action!: [Dumpster Burger are] incredibly abrasive and otherworldly noise-rock and a great addition to anyone's workout mix. MORGAN TROPER


OLD AGE, FERNS, DEER SOULS
(Firkin Tavern, 1937 SE 11th) Two years ago, Ferns drove up I-5 from Eugene to record at Old Standard Sound with engineer Justin Higgins. The trio had a simple goal: to put out a 7-inch. But life got in the way, and Ferns couldn't afford to press the vinyl. Up to this point, the story is far from exceptional; more often than not, smallish bands wish well beyond their means. But rather than let the dream die, Ferns stuck to it, stashed away bits of cash when they could, and finally got the damn thing made. And so tonight the group, led by guitarist Jacob Pavlak (formerly of Yeltsin), celebrate the overdue release of two angular, driving, precisely executed rock tunes etched into sweet, sweet wax. But this little tale is about more than that—it's about following through. So indeed, cheers are in order. To perseverance! ANDREW R TONRY


CHARLIE PARR, BETSE ELLIS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) It's hard to believe that country blues guitarist Charlie Parr is a modern-day musician from Duluth, Minnesota, but it's certainly encouraging that musicians like him still exist. The accomplished guitarist (and doppelganger for Cheech) is seemingly unaffected by our image-driven musical age, his weapons of choice being a resonator guitar, an acoustic 12-string, a fretless banjo, and a husky mid-range voice that complements his plucking. Parr will restore your faith that there are still musicians who don't need eyeliner or a laptop, but just want to play a mean guitar. ROSE FINN

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Comments are closed.

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy