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Friday, April 18, 2014

Tonight in Music: KPSU Kruise, Chinchilla, Godflesh

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Apr 18, 2014 at 11:50 AM


KPSU KRUISE: MAGIC MOUTH, ORQUESTRA PACIFICO TROPICAL
(Portland Spirit, SW Salmon & Naito) Those crazy kids at KPSU have been working their butts off this month to raise money for an FM signal for their radio station. They're throwing all sorts of fun events, culminating with the raging KPSU Kruise—ON A BOAT! Get your ass down low and shake it to and fro for Magic Mouth, and buoy up to the floating bar then out on the floor for the irresistible rhythms of Orquestra Pacifico Tropical. COURTNEY FERGUSON


GIRLS ROCK CAMP FUNDRAISER: CHINCHILLA, CRYPTOBEBELEM, MUTINY MUTINY
(East End, 203 SE Grand) I entirely missed Chinchilla the first time around, but the San Diego four-piece is reuniting for three West Coast gigs, including tonight's fundraiser for Portland's Rock 'n' Roll Camp for Girls, which will serve as their first show in 17 years. The all-female group—Sioban Dixon, Morgan Doctor, Krista Kansas, and Julie D—released 101 Italian Hits back in 1996, an album that sounds downright revolutionary now. Slow-burning tangles of crunch meander down unorthodox pathways, and while I wouldn't call it math or metal (two words that seem to pop up in descriptions of the band, for some reason), it's not grunge or riot grrrl either. Rather, Chinchilla found a firebrand middle ground between these arbitrary genre barriers, and made rock that was as powerful as it was instinctual. Tonight is a once-in-a-lifetime chance to revisit a past that was nearly forgotten. NED LANNAMANN


GODFLESH, CUT HANDS, HOUSE OF LOW CULTURE, LA FIN ABSOLUTE DU MONDE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) Justin Broadrick helped codify an entire subgenre of metal by appearing on just one half of an album. As an early member of Napalm Death, he played guitar on Scum, one of grindcore's earliest templates, but he was only in the lineup that recorded side one. Before you could flip over to side two, Broadrick had already moved on to the next thing. With Godflesh, he traded breakneck speed for methodical and plodding industrial-metal. The result was a decade-plus of innovation, blending elements of techno, dub, and occasionally hiphop with metal in a way that sounded way better than it does on paper. Broadrick played in a slew of projects after Godflesh, most notably Jesu, but he reanimated Godflesh with co-founder G.C. Green back in 2010. Some visa snafus caused the band to reschedule their stateside shows late last year (remember that government shutdown business?), so Godflesh's first US tour since 1996 had to wait a little longer. MWS

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