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Saturday, May 3, 2014

Tonight in Music: Portland City Fair & Exposition, PDX Punk Family Circus, Paradise & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, May 3, 2014 at 10:05 AM


PORTLAND CITY FAIR AND EXPOSITION: TYPHOON, BIG HAUNT, THE MORALS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Why wait for the state fair when we have goats right here? The Portland City Fair & Exposition not only has a "goat appreciation area," but a dunk tank, food carts, performances from bands like Typhoon, giveaways, and Blaze the Trail Cat! Bonus: It benefits the ability-inclusive Harper's Playground. MARJORIE SKINNER


PDX PUNK FAMILY CIRCUS: BLACK AND WHITE, ROUGH KIDS, & MORE
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta; Blackwater Records, 223 NE Russell; Club 21, 2035 NE Glisan) Forget the MusicfestNW announcement—here's a fest for the ages. The first-ever PDX Punk Family Circus gets its name from its supercool Moshburn-drawn flyer, which diagrams a path that begins at Northeast punk/metal sanctuary the Know for its first-ever matinee show (take that, stupid Alberta curfew), down to Blackwater Records for an early evening all-ages set, then over for a free final round at Club 21 that'll go until the wee hours. Japanese punk preservationists Black and White headline both the Know and Club 21 sets, with their steamrolling, bootstomping punk. LA's Rough Kids are also along for the ride, turning around sugar-laden melodies at breakneck paces. This will be a day (and night) to remember; better keep your Sunday morning plans to a minimum. NED LANNAMANN


PARADISE, THE UPSIDEDOWN, THE SUICIDE NOTES
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) The garage-rockers of Paradise have studied their Nuggets anthologies carefully. The local group's buzzing, Farfisa-driven, amphetamine pop is firmly in the vein of the Chocolate Watchband and the 13th Floor Elevators, and they've even included a cover of Status Quo's classic "Pictures of Matchstick Men" on their second album, Soldiers of the Modern Age, for good measure. Tonight's the release party for Soldiers, a worthy platter of high-energy party punk beamed straight from an alternate-dimension 1960s. There's scarcely a weak track here, and tunes like "Just a Dream" boast ambitious songwriting within a familiar template that Paradise have managed to make sound fully vital and current. Amazingly, the album was recorded in a scant two days, so just think what they can do to your brain in the space of a 45-minute set. NL


ULCERATE, RITUAL NECROMANCY, HEATHEN SHRINE, BASTARD FEAST
(Tonic Lounge, 3100 NE Sandy) Metal bands have received lots of attention in recent years for incorporating decidedly non-metal styles into their sound, often in favor of melody and at the expense of heaviness. This is not the model under which Ulcerate operates. The New Zealand death-metal band has been around since the turn of the century, but started rising in profile with the release of 2009's Everything Is Fire and 2011's The Destroyers of All, which moved Ulcerate away from shrieks and wails toward a more guttural sound. Then came last year's epic Vermis, an hour-long slab of monolithic tech-death marked by baleful blast beats, clangorous guitars, Paul Kelland's suffocating growl, and a relentless sense of dark, inexorable dread. Vermis feels like being forced into a body bag, zipped up, and tossed down a zig-zagging garbage chute. If that's your thing, it's glorious. BEN SALMON


BEARCUBBIN', MOON HONEY, ANIMAL EYES
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Esteemed rock critic/virulent douche Robert Christgau once wrote that "virtuosos shouldn't show off—it's bad manners and bad art." He may as well have been referring to math rock, the most hopelessly masturbatory sub-genre in existence. Instrumental band Bearcubbin's latest full-length, Girls with Fun Haircuts (their first with bassist Patrick Dougherty, formerly of Soft Skills, whose contributions are nothing short of immense), is among the few exceptions to this rather unfortunate rule. Bearcubbin's previous efforts intimated varying degrees of potential, but not until now have they successfully been able to synthesize bona fide songwriting chops ("Master Cylinder," in particular, is catchy as fuck) and unavoidable fun with the genre's signature geometric, self-gratifying technicality—something very few of their peers even dare attempt. MORGAN TROPER


NILE, SEASON OF SUFFERING, WORLD OF LIES, GOATHEAD, NECRYPTIC
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) For two decades, Nile have churned out pummeling, densely packed death metal that's equal parts brutal and nerdy. With tightly wound technical riffs, none of it intended for the casual metal tourist, this is willfully difficult stuff. And there's the lyrical content, an obsession with ancient Egypt and Mesopotamian mythology that's provided fodder for seven full-lengths and spawned unwieldy titles like Amongst the Catacombs of Nephren-Ka and "Chapter of Obeisance Before Giving Breath to the Inert One in the Presence of the Crescent Shaped Horns." The South Carolina crew is still touring behind the heaving mass that is 2012's At the Gate of Sethu. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN


FU MANCHU, ELECTRIC CITIZEN, SATYRESS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) All hail Fu Manchu! These dudes have been playing their somewhat sleazy but always heavy brand of catchy desert rock for 27 years now, influencing a generation of dirtbag stoners to tune low and play slow. It's nearly impossible not to have a great time at a Fu Manchu gig—that is, unless you're out of weed. And if that's the case, pretty sure someone in the crowd has you covered. KEVIN DIERS


C AVERAGE, LORD DYING, VANGUARD, ZIRAKZIGIL
(Rotture, 315 SE 3rd) With all the online chatter surrounding '90s-era rock band reunions, one such recombining that might get lost in Veruca Salt's wake is the return of Olympia-based metal duo C Average. Well, I call it a reunion, but it's not as if the band ever made an official statement of dissolution. Rather, guitarist Jon Merithew and drummer Brad Baisley just put it on the shelf for long stretches, stumbling back together every once in a while to peel a new coat of paint off the walls of the world. Their sludgy, smoldering sound is welcome back any time. ROBERT HAM


VIC BONDI, MILLIONS OF DEAD COPS, FLIGHT 19
(Laughing Horse Books, 12 NE 10th) Flight 19 is puerile, virile, no-frills hardcore, with a lone three-song demo to their name. They open for Vic Bondi of Articles of Faith, the seminal hardcore/emo band from Chicago, who should be right at home performing in an anarchist book store. MORGAN TROPER

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