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Saturday, May 31, 2014

Tonight in Music: Dolorean, Throwing Muses, Blood Red Shoes & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, May 31, 2014 at 9:42 AM


DOLOREAN, BARTON CARROLL, MERIDIAN
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) They're giving it all up and moving along. But that doesn't make Dolorean any less magical and special. And when their final live notes drift out at Mississippi Studios, you'll want to be there. DENIS C. THERIAULT Read our article on Dolorean.


THROWING MUSES, TANYA DONNELLY
(Aladdin Theater, 3017 SE Milwaukie) Read our article on Throwing Muses.


BLOOD RED SHOES, RADKEY
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) UK duo Blood Red Shoes have been at it—and at each other's throats—for the better part of a decade. Their self-titled fourth album sums up the band best: noisy, warped blues with a thin layer of polish. Lyrically, they continue to reside in an angsty and macabre desert. Fortunately, it doesn't come off as packaged frustration. Sometimes Blood Red Shoes disfigure their influences enough to make them unrecognizable; other times you have to wonder how much blood, sweat, and tears actually went into it. MARK LORE


GLACIER PALACE, HYENAS, THE DEE DEES
(Habesha, 801 NE Broadway) Joel Magid's new album, Hyenas, is a homegrown porridge of lo-fi anti-pop, record-store-geek jangle, stormy garage-rock of the classic '60s variety, and a few moments of indefinable weirdness. In other words, it's a blast—full of attitude and sunlight and darkness and fun. "Snakes, I Love You" has relentless forward momentum, while "The Most Terrible Mountains" is a cool, mentholated sermon from a lonely mountaintop. Magid is celebrating the release of Hyenas by forming a group of that name to play the record-release show. The live band features members of And And And, the Protons, and the Ex-Girlfriends Club, and should be the perfect outfit to convey Hyenas' sloped-shoulder shuffle. NED LANNAMANN


METALACHI, EDNA VAZQUEZ
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) When I described Metalachi to a group of friends over beers, they gave me the look you give your stoner friend when he says he's going to be the next president. "No, really," I insisted. "They do, like, mariachi-style covers of metal songs." Whether or not those fuckos come to the show, it will be difficult for anyone not to smile and dance through the whole performance. Metalachi clearly demonstrates their ability to play mariachi music with utmost sincerity, as well as a passion for Black Sabbath and Guns N' Roses. Though one could argue their name is not the most creative, Metalachi performs true-blue mariachi music, with pinpoint trumpeting and the shortest of cut-off shorts. Take 'em or leave 'em. ROSE FINN


THE BRIEFS, SEX CRIME, YOUTHBITCH, THE CRY, DJ ROXY EPOXY, DJ KEN DIRTNAP
(East End, 203 SE Grand) This is the first tour for Seattle skinny-tie punks the Briefs in over seven years. It also marks the 15th anniversary for the group—who now have members scattered all over the West Coast and as far away as Berlin. Their 2000 debut album, Hit After Hit, recorded when Bill "Slick Willie" Clinton was still president, has one of the catchiest, '77-style pop-punk anthems ever written—a little ditty about being "Poor and Weird." I expect the band will still be poor. And weird. And bleach-bottle-blondes. And you can bet your mother's bathroom slippers they're still as rowdy as all hell—they were always the next best thing to traveling back in time to see the Adverts or the Buzzcocks. KELLY O


ELECTRICIAN, THE BINARY MARKETING SHOW, WHALES WAILING, ACTUAL BIRDS
(Red & Black Café, 400 SE 12th) Electrician is made up of two new parents who tour in a motor home and sing about the end of the world. Led by songwriter Neil Campau (formerly of the brilliantly chaotic freak-folk group World History), Electrician's ominous pop songs are the political equivalent of the traditional murder ballad—instead of a lover dying, it's civilization as a whole and all the symbols of power that come with it. But unlike other groups with a political agenda, their aim is not didactic lecturing or anthemic preaching, but simply to bring buried feelings to the surface. They ask you to deal with any looming interior dread and let it out. What results is an almost celebratory trip into the things that scare us. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON


THE FAINT, REPTAR
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) While cleaning out my garage last weekend, I found a 2003 issue of an old Chico music magazine called Devil in the Woods. The cover photo showed a bunch of twentysomethings hanging out in front of a stone wall under the headline "The Year Omaha Broke." Jenny Lewis was there, as was Conor Oberst. I assume the Faint were there, too, given that they're Omahans, but I wasn't sure, because I don't know what they look like. I do know, however, that the Faint are survivors. After their self-released 2008 album, Fasciinatiion, the band ended, and members went their separate ways until last spring, when they gathered again to make their sixth album. Doom Abuse showcases all of the band's good and bad attributes: pulsing synths, post-punk spirit, pop melodies, glammy swagger, and so-so songwriting. The Faint are older and presumably wiser, but they still seem to have just one sonic gear. BEN SALMON


WOLVSERPENT, HELL, WILL O' THE WISP, HAIL
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Boise's Wolvserpent makes the kind of cinematic metal that turns dreams into nightmares. Even scarier is the fact that this apocalyptic noise comes from just two people—multi-instrumentalists Brittany McConnell and Blake Green. Three quarters of the way through the 16-minute "Within the Light of Fire," and I'm ready to retreat to my shelter. And that's one of their shorter pieces. Wolvserpent creates ambient not only with guitars and drums, but also strings and field recordings, opting for the slow build over the straight bludgeon. It's compelling stuff, and being in a dark room with a group of strangers should only give the music more weight. ML

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