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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Tonight in Music: David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights, Eidolons, Wolfmother & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Wed, Jul 30, 2014 at 1:03 PM


DAVID KILGOUR AND THE HEAVY EIGHTS, THE SHIFTING SANDS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Read our article on David Kilgour and the Heavy Eights.


EIDOLONS, ANIMAL EYES, TALKATIVE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The shift from tension to resolution characterizes virtually every piece of music you've ever listened to, but Portland band Eidolons are more upfront about that shift than most guitar-wielding indie-rock bands. The group releases two EPs tonight in place of the expected full-length, and the band spikes some very pleasing sounds with large swaths of dissonance, subverting your ears' expectations with surprising twists and turns. The result is a record—excuse me, pair of records that sound more interesting and involving each time you listen. In fact, one could argue that Eidolons' method of splitting their 13 new tunes over two releases is an extension of the tension-vs.-release thesis. The Big Yellow Shirt collects the wirier, rockier songs, echoing Pavement, Television, and the Fall, while Hard Hang in a Deep Country is twangier and looser, ornamented with syrup-sweet pedal steel guitar. But Eidolons is no two-trick pony; these EPs evidence an aptitude for uncovering new songwriting territory as well as a sound that's unlike any other band in town. NED LANNAMANN


WOLFMOTHER, ELECTRIC CITIZEN, SONS OF HUNS
(Roseland, 8 NW 6th) Part of what allowed Wolfmother's 2005 self-titled debut to catch fire was that rock music was in a pretty shabby state at the time—that and the fact that it really is a wicked-solid rock record. Since rock has righted itself, main man Andrew Stockdale has had a tough go of it. After album number two bit the dust, he dismantled the band for five years before returning earlier this year with the self-released New Crown. It righteously rocks, but it's so far failed to meet many ears, which is weird considering how many bands out there are finding success aping the same stuff Wolfmother apes. In a weird way, nine years feels like a longer time ago than the era Stockdale pulls from. I bet he'd agree. MARK LORE


IN SCHOOL, DEFECT DEFECT, THE STOPS, MALADJUSTED
(Laughing Horse Books, 12 NE 10th) In School is an interminably frustrated, '80s-style hardcore band from New York that released a stellar, six-song 7-inch earlier in the spring entitled Praxis of Hate. MORGAN TROPER


CUT HANDS, SWEET TOOTH, LADYWOLF
(East End, 203 SE Grand) As the main provocateur behind Whitehouse, William Bennett has wielded enormous influence over noise music. Every cassette-peddling power electronics project owes a debt to his taboo-embracing catalog, but these days he's releasing records as Cut Hands and trading piercing feedback and shrill wailing for what he calls "Afro noise." The first Cut Hands releases maintained some of the more aggressive sounds of Whitehouse, infusing them with Afrobeat rhythms, but as the project has evolved, the edges have smoothed. After spending 30 years churning out extreme noise, this is probably the weirdest thing Bennett could be making—music that's warm and inviting. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN


LUCINDA WILLIAMS, GERALD COLLIER
(Oregon Zoo, 4001 SW Canyon) On September 30, the great American songwriter Lucinda Williams will release her 11th album, Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone, and it is highly likely that fans at tonight's zoo show will be treated to a few highlights from this forthcoming release. It's also likely that Williams will ravish the crowd with the songs with which she's been ravishing crowds for the past 25 years. The Lucinda Williams Songbook is loaded with many of the best-songs-ever, including but not limited to the best-song-ever about processing a loved one's suicide ("Sweet Old World"), the best-song-ever about needing physical distance from someone you can't live without ("Side of the Road"), the best-song-ever about missing someone while touching yourself ("Right in Time"), and the best-ever use of the past tense in a pop song ("Metal Firecracker"). DAVID SCHMADER


MINIATURE TIGERS, THE GRISWOLDS, FINISH TICKET, YOUNG RISING SONS
(Holocene, 1001 SE Morrison) The first time I saw and heard Brooklyn's Miniature Tigers, I wasn't sure if it was a joke or a real thing. The joke was on me. Publications and blogs have been singing the band's praises for their catchy and quirky synth-pop tunes. I will give them that: Miniature Tigers' latest LP, Cruel Runnings, is catchy and quirky, but it's catchy to the point where you have to wonder if these four baby-faced lads aren't better suited to write commercial jingles. They'd sell the shit out of some acne cream. ML

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