This Week in the Mercury

The 99 Percent

Film

The 99 Percent

The Purge Expands Its World with a Sturdy Sequel


Scatological Alchemy

Film

Scatological Alchemy

Jodorowsky Still Wants to Change the World



Tonight!

Monday, July 21, 2014

Tonight in Music: Magik Markers, the Foreign Exchange, Ryley Walker

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Mon, Jul 21, 2014 at 10:27 AM


MAGIK MARKERS, XDS, ARCTIC FLOWERS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Woe to the Magik Markers completist. The Hartford band has long been the Guided by Voices of nouveau no wave; Discogs.com puts the band's run of homemade tapes, CD-Rs, and official releases at 51 since 2001, but that still somehow seems a little low. Amid those titles are standouts like 2005's I Trust My Guitar, Etc. and 2007's Boss, along with dozens and dozens of hidden gems. But even with that massive output, the East Coast noise-mongers' reputation as a live band dwarfs it. Song structure hasn't always carried much importance in the trio's oeuvre, so just hearing them isn't always enough. Sometimes you've gotta feel them, too. MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN


THE FOREIGN EXCHANGE
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Rapper/singer Phonte (formerly of celebrated supergroup Little Brother) and Dutch producer Nicolay didn't meet in person until after the release of their first album (hence their name, the Foreign Exchange), but Connected was an instant classic based on its backstory and breezy indie-rap sound. All of the results since the two finally met and collaborated in person—including last year's Love in Flying Colors—have taken a much more grown-'n'-sexy R&B approach than their debut, with Phonte almost completely abandoning rapping for singing, which he fortunately does well. Though fans of their initial head-nodding, backpacker-friendly stuff might be turned off by this, the Foreign Exchange's music is pretty well-suited for a live environment, especially if it's on a date night. MIKE RAMOS


RYLEY WALKER
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Ryley Walker's bio doesn't hide from the 24-year-old Chicagoan's influences: American folk-jazz heroes Tim Hardin and Tim Buckley and British folk-rock pioneer/Pentangle founder Bert Jansch are cited in the third sentence. When you put out a record as good as Walker's debut, see, you don't have to play coy. All Kinds of You, released in April, is a stunning collection of modern folk songs that sound as old as time, where fingerpicked guitar ambles along with melodic ease, regularly making way for a swollen string section or Walker's perfectly weathered voice. Besides the sonic similarities, his songs share an adventurous quality with Pentangle's work, in that they take bits of beauty, bind them together, and gather momentum in a way that feels bold and assured but sometimes on the verge of ruin. If you're driving, it no doubt makes perfect sense. If you're not, you wonder. And that's exciting. BEN SALMON

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Tonight in Music: Mike Sempert, PDX Pop Now!, Au Revoir Simone & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sun, Jul 20, 2014 at 9:14 AM


MIKE SEMPERT
(Rontoms, 600 E Burnside) Read our article on Mike Sempert.


PDX POP NOW!
(AudioCinema, 226 SE Madison) See All-Ages Action!


AU REVOIR SIMONE, DRESSES, THE LOWER 48
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Put together three keyboard-wielding ladies from Brooklyn, and you end up with the swoony, dreamy pop of Au Revoir Simone. (Note: This may not work with just any keyboard-wielding ladies from Brooklyn—as there are probably hundreds. Make sure you get the right three.) Last year's Move in Spectrums was Au Revoir Simone's smartest and sharpest work so far, and their live show is always a delight. NED LANNAMANN

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Saturday, July 19, 2014

Tonight in Music: Denver, PDX Pop Now!, Weinland & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, Jul 19, 2014 at 10:06 AM


DENVER, MICHAEL HURLEY
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Denver.


PDX POP NOW!
(AudioCinema, 226 SE Madison) See All-Ages Action!


WEINLAND, HOOK AND ANCHOR, PETER RAINBEAU
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Aside from their super-popular New Year's shows, it's been quite a while since the Adam Shearer-fronted Weinland—one of Portland's best bands—has gotten together to play original work. Tonight they are, and you shouldn't miss it! Seeing Weinland a few years ago in the barn at Pickathon is still one of my favorite shows ever. ERIK HENRIKSEN

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Friday, July 18, 2014

Tonight in Music: PDX Pop Now!, the Hoons, Vince Staples & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Jul 18, 2014 at 10:56 AM


PDX POP NOW!
(AudioCinema, 226 SE Madison) See All-Ages Action!


THE HOONS, DEAD REMEDY, THE LOVELY LOST, GUN FU
(Ash Street Saloon, 225 SW Ash) The Hoons based their latest batch of songs on stories from Radiolab, but you won't hear arty audio collages or documentary-style interview segments on the band's new self-titled album. Rather, the Hoons specialize in meaty, potato-ey rock, with two guitars and room-filling drums. The band moved to Portland from Anchorage, Alaska, in 2012 after having done time on Warped Tour, and there's a utilitarian sound to the record, as if the band knows how to get its message across without too much fuss. It works well on The Hoons, as the band moves from wiry indie riffs to Southern boogie to radio-ready choruses over the course of the record's 11 tracks. NED LANNAMANN


VINCE STAPLES, AUDIO PUSH, SKEME, J. SIRUS
(Alhambra Theatre, 4811 SE Hawthorne) Vince Staples first came to the attention of the hiphop world in 2010 via his association with the various threads of the Odd Future gang, nabbing guest verses on Earl Sweatshirt and Mike G's solo efforts. The young Californian has since catapulted beyond his peers, particularly this year with the release of his mixtape, Shyne Coldchain Vol. 2. With the help of producers No ID and Scoop DeVille, Staples is by turns sinister (the scrabbling, challenging "Shots"), ruminative ("Nate," where he explores his fractious relationship with his father), and boastful (the chest-pounding, Wu-Tang-inspired "Trunk Rattle"). He's joined by Audio Push, a duo of Golden Staters who are deeply tied in with the limber-limbed dance movement known as jerkin'. ROBERT HAM

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Thursday, July 17, 2014

Tonight in Music: Tiny Ruins, the Hold Steady, Frank Fairfield & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Thu, Jul 17, 2014 at 11:41 AM


TINY RUINS, BIG HAUNT, AU DUNES
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Tiny Ruins.


THE HOLD STEADY, CHEAP GIRLS
(Wonder Ballroom, 128 NE Russell) On Tuesday, the Minnesota Twins hosted the MLB all-star game for the first time since the week I was born. As someone who grew up spending summers along the Mississippi, I wanted nothing more than to spend that day in the Twin Cities. I'm positive Hold Steady frontman Craig Finn felt the same way while he was busy on the road, spinning coming-of-age tales, packed full of hope in the face of despair. Finn spent his youth watching Twins baseball and dragging his dad to record stores to purchase Replacements albums. Three decades on, he's composed a ballpark anthem for the team, and his band are primed to share the stage with Westerberg and Stinson at their homecoming reunion this September. Finn thoroughly embodies his life-affirming, classic-rock laden anthems, and it's this trait that makes witnessing the Hold Steady live an experience that's as genuine and inspiring as they come. CHIPP TERWILLIGER


FRANK FAIRFIELD
(Duff's Garage, 2530 NE 82nd) Frank Fairfield has had good luck with record labels in his young career. His first two albums—2009's self-titled and 2011's Out on the Open West—came out on Tompkins Square, one of the world's finest excavators of ancient and contemporary folk music. And earlier this year, Jack White's Third Man Records put out a Fairfield 7-inch called "Duncan and Brady," which is probably not a tribute to the great San Antonio Spurs big man and the handsome New England Patriots quarterback. Point is: There's a good chance that Jack White, lover of things that are a bit odd and out-of-time, has heard Fairfield's mesmerizing, pitch-perfect take on traditional music and pre-war folk-blues. And if Jack and Third Man are behind Fairfield, who's to say he couldn't blow up? Old-time music for old souls everywhere. Let's do this. BEN SALMON

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Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Tonight in Music: Natural Child, Filter, Mecca Normal & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Wed, Jul 16, 2014 at 2:42 PM


NATURAL CHILD, THE ABIGAILS, JOEL MAGID
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) The mudflap country-rock of Natural Child is perfect for kickin' back, boozin', tokin', or whatever sort of trouble you feel like getting into. If your musical heart lies somewhere between the cow pastures and the punk-rock basement—but cowpunk never made a lick o' sense to you—this Nashville trio is exactly what you've been looking for. NED LANNAMANN


FILTER, HELMET, LOCAL H, DEMURE
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) When Filter's debut album, Short Bus, dropped in 1995, industrial music was reaching a climax of wrench-clanging, steam-valve-sampling glory, typified by the crossover success of a song that featured in its chorus a pre-Hulk Trent Reznor whispering, "I wanna fuck you like an animal." Saucy stuff. Filter's "Hey Man Nice Shot," a vague endorsement of the public suicide of shamed Pennsylvania politician Budd Dwyer, launched them into the spotlight on Nine Inch Nail's coattails, and the band—whose frontman Richard Patrick actually played in NIN at one point—achieved modest success by almost completely aping Reznor's catalog, before finalizing their pop ambitions with the airy 1999 single "Take a Picture." Luckily Helmet are on this bill, too, and they've retained pretty much every inch of their clout since 1992's Meantime. RYAN J. PRADO


THE HIVE DWELLERS, MECCA NORMAL, SPIDER AND THE WEBS
(Red & Black Café, 400 SE 12th) Of all the bands that emerged from the vibrant '90s underground scene, the one that's most unfairly glossed over is Mecca Normal. It's likely something to do with the Canadian duo's uncompromising sound: the slashing guitar chords of David Lester snapping at singer Jean Smith's challenging feminist lyrics and fearless singing. It was blues music filtered through a punk prism. Twenty-plus years later, and the pair haven't shifted their aesthetic in the least, only calmed it a little. Their most recent album, Empathy for the Evil, was recorded with former Bongwater founder Kramer, who adds a welcome psychedelic tinge that lends a strangely wistful quality to these often stirring political anthems. This show continues M'lady's Record's series of shows celebrating the Portland label's seventh anniversary. ROBERT HAM

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Tuesday, July 15, 2014

Tonight in Music: Ear Candy, Wolves in the Throne Room, Globelamp & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Tue, Jul 15, 2014 at 10:35 AM


EAR CANDY: BLACKWITCH PUDDING, STONEBURNER, BURIALS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) For this week's Ear Candy showcase, Mississippi Studios and the Mercury have brought together three of the best heavy bands in town: Blackwitch Pudding's mammoth lysergic doom, Stoneburner's demonic crust-sludge, and the progressive black metal of Burials. It'll be majestically bone-chilling, totally free, and really, really loud. NED LANNAMANN


WOLVES IN THE THRONE ROOM, NOMMO OGO, DRUDEN
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Read our article on Wolves in the Throne Room.


GLOBELAMP, ADVENTUROUS SLEEPING, THE OCEAN FLOOR
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Olympia's Elizabeth le Fey records as Globelamp, and her new album, Star Dust—released on cassette by Gazelle Recordings—is an absolute stunner. Less discerning ears might hear it as jumbled, lo-fi murk, but in point of fact it's a dizzying, careering quilt of psychedelic folk, so trippy it'll inflict a contact high. Le Fey's songs meander, but never aimlessly; their intricate details are like being given the godly gift of seeing all life forms in a vast forest at once, with birds swooping through branches, thorns twisting through gnarled brush, and subterranean creatures burrowing through fecund earth. Le Fey gained some notoriety as a touring member of Foxygen—yes, those were her Tumblr posts that shone a spotlight on that band's acute growing pains during their 2013 tour—but with Star Dust, it's clear that the miraculous, medieval-tinged sound tapestries she makes as Globelamp are all anyone should be talking about. NL

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Monday, July 14, 2014

Tonight in Music: Wye Oak, Shelby Earl

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Mon, Jul 14, 2014 at 10:32 AM


WYE OAK, PATTERN IS MOVEMENT
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Baltimore two-piece Wye Oak have reinvented themselves with Shriek, a synth-heavy album created while drummer Andy Stack was living here in Portland. Singer Jenn Wasner ditched her guitar in favor of bass, creating an altogether new sound for her songs, which'll no doubt take on Wye Oak's customary live magnetism. NED LANNAMANN


SHELBY EARL, KYLE O'QUIN
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) One of the more consistently excellent live music options in town is the weekly residency series at Al's Den. It's afforded the opportunity to catch artists as they stretch their creative limbs a bit, playing seven nights in the low-key basement venue that's steeped in (sordid) Portland history. Seattle's Shelby Earl begins her run of performances there tonight, and they'd be can't-miss even if they weren't free. Her Damien Jurado-produced Swift Arrows arrived late last year, boasting a confidence and ease rare in second albums, with songs like the title track and "Grown Up Things" approaching a timeless sound that's even less common. More recently, a version of Michael Jackson's "P.Y.T."—recorded for an episode of Grey's Anatomy this past spring—showed off the kind of adventurous spirit that's helped Earl avoid the familiar trappings of the singer-songwriter. JEREMY PETERSEN

Sunday, July 13, 2014

Tonight in Music: St. Even, A Sunny Day in Glasgow, Shelby Earl & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sun, Jul 13, 2014 at 9:26 AM


PICKIN' ON SUNDAYS: ST. EVEN, BARRY BRUSSEAU
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Portland might be a miserable puddle of overcast for most of the year, but its summers make it all worth it. And one of the highlights of those summers is Pickin' on Sundays, when the Doug Fir's patio hosts excellent acoustic acts in the sun, for free, with ready access to booze. Today St. Even and Barry Brusseau take the "stage," and you will have a delightful time. ERIK HENRIKSEN


A SUNNY DAY IN GLASGOW, GOLDEN RETRIEVER, TENDER AGE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) A Sunny Day in Glasgow started in Philly but are now scattered across two continents. So when it came time to make their third album, Sea When Absent, the band was forced to piece together its fizzy dream-pop; arrangement responsibility shifted, a new lyricist emerged, production was handled by an outsider, and so on. As a result, the new album finds ASDIG sounding more kaleidoscopic and less shoegazey. Led by two beautifully airy female voices, Sea When Absent is playful and elusive, unafraid of sonic and rhythmic shifts. It sounds like perfect dream-pop chopped up into pieces and tossed into a swirling, sugary wind. It's also one of the best records of 2014. If you miss School of Seven Bells, after Ben Curtis' death in December, make a beeline for A Sunny Day in Glasgow. BEN SALMON


SHELBY EARL, ZACH FLEURY
(Al's Den, 303 SW 12th) One of the more consistently excellent live music options in town is the weekly residency series at Al's Den. It's afforded the opportunity to catch artists as they stretch their creative limbs a bit, playing seven nights in the low-key basement venue that's steeped in (sordid) Portland history. Seattle's Shelby Earl begins her run of performances there tonight, and they'd be can't-miss even if they weren't free. Her Damien Jurado-produced Swift Arrows arrived late last year, boasting a confidence and ease rare in second albums, with songs like the title track and "Grown Up Things" approaching a timeless sound that's even less common. More recently, a version of Michael Jackson's "P.Y.T."—recorded for an episode of Grey's Anatomy this past spring—showed off the kind of adventurous spirit that's helped Earl avoid the familiar trappings of the singer-songwriter. JEREMY PETERSEN

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Saturday, July 12, 2014

Tonight in Music: Run On Sentence, Peter Matthew Bauer, Sheer Terror & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Sat, Jul 12, 2014 at 9:19 AM


RUN ON SENTENCE, STAR ANNA
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Read our article on Run On Sentence.


PETER MATTHEW BAUER, JAPANESE GUY
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Many critics loved erudite New York indie-rock band the Walkmen, but not this one. Sonically speaking, they struck me as one of the blandest acts of the '00s. I saw them perform once in Orange County, and it felt like being politely force-fed mayonnaise on white Wonder® Bread sandwiches. Peter Matthew Bauer played bass for the Walkmen, so he shares some of the blame for their offenses. But his debut solo album, Liberation!—while not a bastion of innovation by any means—contains more flavor per song than his old unit's albums ever did. Liberation! revolves around Bauer's upbringing in a Hindu yoga cult and explores the nature of belief and its repercussions. Overall, it sounds like a hybrid of Brian Jonestown Massacre's vaguely Eastern-leaning psychedelia and Tom Petty's blue-collar rock—which is more interesting than the Walkmen. DAVE SEGAL


SHEER TERROR, POISON IDEA, LONGKNIFE, & MORE
(Star Theater, 13 NW 6th) Originating in the mid-'80s, Sheer Terror were an immensely influential New York City punk band that had funny album covers. They're otherwise noteworthy for synthesizing the velocity of then-novel early hardcore with sludgy, Church of Iommi riffage. Their latest record, Standing Up for Falling Down, is the group's first proper LP in 18 years. MORGAN TROPER

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Friday, July 11, 2014

Tonight in Music: Drunk Dad, Amen Dunes, Childbirth & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Fri, Jul 11, 2014 at 12:05 PM


DRUNK DAD, HEALTH PROBLEMS, HONDURAN, BIG BLACK CLOUD, TYRANTS
(Information Warehouse, 411 SE 6th) At long last, here is the Drunk Dad album Ripper Killer, released July 1 on the unfuckwithable Eolian Empire imprint. Can the Portland blast masters sustain their particularly nihilistic brand of speed-sludge-noise over the course of a full-length? Unquestionably so. While a small amount of intestinal fortitude is required to make your way through the not-to-be-listened-to-lightly Ripper Killer, it's a fascinating, involving record that measures its bleakness with a truly intelligent approach to noise. And its bottomless wellspring of energy is a kick in the ass. Drunk Dad are one of Portland's most pulverizing live bands, and there are four other brutal bands on the bill, so ramp up those expectations: This show's going to be insane. NED LANNAMANN


AMEN DUNES, AXXA/ABRAXAS
(Bunk Bar, 1028 SE Water) Damon McMahon's third album under the name Amen Dunes is by far his most accessible and put-together. Whereas McMahon's first two full-lengths—2009's DIA and 2011's Through Donkey Jaw—were mostly sparse affairs, made swiftly and solitarily, the new one, simply called Love, is relatively lush, featuring playing by longtime collaborators as well as members of Godspeed You! Black Emperor. (McMahon recorded Love in Montreal.) Old-school fans may long for Amen Dunes' more spartan days, but the luxuries of time and outside assistance help anchor McMahon's floaty, faraway folk songs and bring his resonant, drawn-out melodies into focus. The result is bewitching without sacrificing peculiarity. Songwriters get dragged out of the lo-fi lowlands all the time; if the songs are strong enough—Darnielle, Malkmus, Elliott Smith, etc.—they'll translate with a little sheen. McMahon's are strong enough. BEN SALMON


COCKEYE, LOVE AND CARING, CHILDBIRTH, LISA PRANK
(The Foggy Notion, 3416 N Lombard) I'm a sucker for almost any witty name given to a music project. That said, it's pretty infrequent for the sound behind such a name to be worth mentioning, and even rarer for the music to actually relate to the clever wordplay at hand. Enter Lisa Prank, the alias of recent Seattle transplant Robin Edwards. Armed with a guitar and a drum machine, Edwards' debut cassette, Crush on the World, completely owns her self-described "Trapper Keeper pop punk" style. The tape is five tracks of lo-fi, bubblegum-shaded cuddle-core, with sentimental lyrics that would feel right at home scrawled out in milky pen and folded into the neon pockets of a three-ring binder. Making the trek down I-5 along with Edwards is the Seattle-based punk-rock supergroup, Childbirth. Featuring members of Tacocat, Pony Time, and Chastity Belt, the trio embody a playful, yet vital gender-bias, targeting attitude within amusing and vivacious anthems. CHIPP TERWILLIGER

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Thursday, July 10, 2014

Tonight in Music: Portland Cello Project, Small Skies, the Fresh and Onlys & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Thu, Jul 10, 2014 at 11:57 AM


SUNDOWN AT ECOTRUST: PORTLAND CELLO PROJECT
(Jean Vollum Natural Capital Center, 721 NW 9th) Ecotrust kicks off a series of four free summer sundown concerts tonight with an "all-ages dance party" from the popular Portland Cello Project. The PCP's similar "extreme" dance parties are known to sell out quickly (shows on Friday and Saturday at Doug Fir are already full), so here's your chance to skip the scalper's punishing gouge. DIRK VANDERHART


SMALL SKIES, FOREIGN ORANGE, AMENTA ABIOTO
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Benjamin Tyler used to record under the name Stepkid, but he's morphed that project into the new Small Skies, enlisting the spontaneous contributions of friends to offset his carefully crafted, electronic-based sonic panoramas. Small Skies' intriguing debut album (self-titled) juxtaposes dark, coiled synths with booming, crashing live drums, and the results are both invigorating and ominous. For every joyous pop summit like "So Long," there's the wobbling, claustrophobic "New Home," and Tyler often overruns his melodies with echo, creating an indistinct, erased quality with his voice. What remains perfectly in focus is Tyler's piercing vision, and he injects a surprising amount of emotion into the abstractions on Small Skies, giving the record a gravity that's impossible to discount. NED LANNAMANN


THE FRESH AND ONLYS, THE SHILOHS, OLD LIGHT
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) You may've already heard the Fresh and Onlys. When the long-lost-then-found Rodriguez (subject of the Oscar-winning documentary Searching for Sugar Man) returned to the stage, the Fresh and Onlys, a four-piece garage band from San Francisco, backed him up. "The Fresh and Onlys are a very cultured band," Rodriguez told me in 2012. "They have kind of a caliber, a high caliber of performance—and also in their demeanor." That's high praise from a man of such demonstrated character and no-bullshit bona fides. To be sure, supporting Rodriguez did not make the Fresh and Onlys, it emphasized their past excellence. But at the same time it's almost impossible that getting so close to Rodriguez and performing his songs night-in, night-out didn't affect the Onlys, whose House of Spirits, released last month, is smoky, groovy, gritty, and marvelously played. Though likely much more, the Onlys must've at least learned from Rodriguez the blessing of humility, if not that the cosmos maintains, at best, a cruel sense of timing and justice. ANDREW R TONRY

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Tonight in Music: Blue Skies for Black Hearts, Young & Sick, Broken Water & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Wed, Jul 9, 2014 at 1:32 PM


SPIRIT LAKE, BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS, YOUNG VIENNA
(Doug Fir, 830 E Burnside) Read our article on Blue Skies for Black Hearts.


YOUNG & SICK, BENT DENIM, EXROYALE
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) When he's not making album covers and designing T-shirts, Dutch-born LA-based Nick Van Hofwegen—AKA Young & Sick—makes brightly colored, falsetto-strewn electro R&B that'll get any party started. His slow jams are tender, but make sure you have your dancing shoes on for songs like "Glass." NED LANNAMANN


CIVIL UNION, BROKEN WATER, ARCTIC FLOWERS
(The Know, 2026 NE Alberta) Channeling early Sub Pop and New York art rock, Olympia's Broken Water creates hazy, perfectly minimal, trance-inducing rock music. Their records are universally celebrated, and extend from the weighted pop songs of Tempest on Hardly Art to the experimental excursions of their self-released collaborative work with legendary Seattle cellist Lori Goldston, Seaside and Sedmirkrásky. Their live shows—while not at all flashy—are intensely mesmerizing affairs, and at their best convince you that Broken Water has found a holy intersection between drone and punk. JOSHUA JAMES AMBERSON

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Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Tonight in Music: Reigning Sound, Ceremony, Sapient & More

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Tue, Jul 8, 2014 at 10:48 AM


REIGNING SOUND, THE TRIPWIRES, THEE HEADLINERS, ADIOS AMIGOS
(Dante's, 350 W Burnside) Not all rock 'n' roll can be as evergreen as the warm, in-the-pocket garage jangle of Greg Cartwright's Reigning Sound, who might very well be sitting on the album of the year. Catch the Memphis/Asheville group and their killer, R&B-informed sound as they play future chestnuts from the splendid Shattered, which comes out July 15 on Merge. NED LANNAMANN Also, read our article on Reigning Sound.


CEREMONY, YOUNG TURKS, SLOTHS
(Slabtown, 1033 NW 16th) Ceremony successfully punk'd their fanbase with 2012's Zoo, a crystalline, mid-tempo rock album that sounds worlds apart from the emphatic, disquieting powerviolence of their previous releases. While Zoo has some boring patches and can feel more like an ironic, calculated attempt at alienating HXC suckers (which didn't really succeed—pretty much everyone listened to it) than a record with real artistic weight, the great songs on Zoo leave little to be desired. Opener "Hysteria" is the catchiest thing Ceremony's ever produced (I'm even tempted to call it a "pop song," but that's probably just me projecting). On additional highlight "Adult," lead singer Ross Farrar eulogizes his youth in a manner that's both totally disingenuous and strangely touching. All bands have to grow up sooner or later—but don't worry, guys, I'm pretty sure Ceremony is still pretending. MORGAN TROPER


SAPIENT, ILLMACULATE, GOLDINI BAGWELL, LOAD B, SLICK DEVIOUS
(Mississippi Studios, 3939 N Mississippi) Last year, Marcus Williams—better known to the Portland listening public as Sapient—found new portholes to let light into the good ship hiphop, and his 2013 Slump album was a hiphop record that eschewed the use of sampling and rapping altogether. Sape's brand-new Eaters Volume Two: Light Tiger is anything but a step backward, with an emphasis on his stylistically wide-ranging production, which embraces indie rock and pop, along with more traditional hiphop and electronic music tropes. "Mansion" is a chirping videogame party waiting to happen, and "Dents" positions acoustic-folk overtones on its banging-drum backbeat. If Eaters Volume Two's diversity gives it a sketchbook feel, its assurance with all of its different genres—and Sapient's wry but uplifting outlook—makes it a terrific listen from start to finish. NL

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Monday, July 7, 2014

Tonight in Music: Cannibal Corpse

Posted by Ned Lannamann on Mon, Jul 7, 2014 at 10:42 AM


CANNIBAL CORPSE, SUICIDE SILENCE, WRETCHED, PATH TO RUIN, A WORLD WITHOUT
(Hawthorne Theatre, 1507 SE César E. Chávez) If there weren't already an Eagles of Death Metal, Cannibal Corpse would be the Eagles of death metal. From the cameo in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective to the ridiculously over-the-top, gory album covers to the decency-challenging song titles ("I Cum Blood," "Entrails Ripped From a Virgin's Cunt," "Necropedophile"—and those are just from one album), Cannibal Corpse are easily death metal's most recognizable name. They helped codify a particular strain of horror-inspired, guttural music, even while they were getting their albums banned by different countries at various points in their career. So go celebrate the First Amendment by breaking a limb in the pit during "Hammer Smashed Face." MATTHEW W. SULLIVAN

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